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Article: Influenza hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titer as a mediator of vaccine-induced protection for influenza B

TitleInfluenza hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titer as a mediator of vaccine-induced protection for influenza B
Authors
KeywordsInfluenza
Vaccination
Hemagglutination inhibition
Correlate of protection
Issue Date2019
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/
Citation
Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 68 n. 10, p. 1713-1717 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay is an established correlate of protection for the inactivated influenza vaccine. However, the proportion of vaccine-induced protection that is mediated by the post-vaccination HAI titer has not been assessed. Methods: We used data from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a split-virion inactivated influenza vaccine in children aged 6–17 years. Sera were collected before and 30 days after receipt of vaccination or placebo and tested by the HAI assay against B/Brisbane/60/2008-like (B/Victoria lineage). We fitted Cox proportional hazards models to the time to laboratory-confirmed influenza B. We used causal mediation analysis to estimate the proportion of the total effect of vaccination that was mediated by higher HAI titers. Results: We estimated that vaccine efficacy against confirmed B/Victoria infection was 68% (95% confidence interval, 33%, 88%), and post-vaccination HAI titers explained 57% of the effect of vaccination on protection. Conclusions: The majority of the effect of inactivated influenza vaccination in children is mediated by the increased HAI titer after vaccination; however, other components of the immune response to vaccination may also play a role in protection and should be further explored. Causal mediation analysis provides a framework to quantify the role of various mediators of protection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/262257
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 9.117
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.742

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorLim, WW-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorFang, J-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorTchetgen Tchetgen, EJ-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-28T04:56:09Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-28T04:56:09Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 68 n. 10, p. 1713-1717-
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/262257-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay is an established correlate of protection for the inactivated influenza vaccine. However, the proportion of vaccine-induced protection that is mediated by the post-vaccination HAI titer has not been assessed. Methods: We used data from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a split-virion inactivated influenza vaccine in children aged 6–17 years. Sera were collected before and 30 days after receipt of vaccination or placebo and tested by the HAI assay against B/Brisbane/60/2008-like (B/Victoria lineage). We fitted Cox proportional hazards models to the time to laboratory-confirmed influenza B. We used causal mediation analysis to estimate the proportion of the total effect of vaccination that was mediated by higher HAI titers. Results: We estimated that vaccine efficacy against confirmed B/Victoria infection was 68% (95% confidence interval, 33%, 88%), and post-vaccination HAI titers explained 57% of the effect of vaccination on protection. Conclusions: The majority of the effect of inactivated influenza vaccination in children is mediated by the increased HAI titer after vaccination; however, other components of the immune response to vaccination may also play a role in protection and should be further explored. Causal mediation analysis provides a framework to quantify the role of various mediators of protection.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Clinical Infectious Diseases following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 68 n. 10, p. 1713-1717 is available online at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciy759-
dc.subjectInfluenza-
dc.subjectVaccination-
dc.subjectHemagglutination inhibition-
dc.subjectCorrelate of protection-
dc.titleInfluenza hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titer as a mediator of vaccine-induced protection for influenza B-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFang, J: vickyf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.identifier.authorityPerera, RAPM=rp02500-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cid/ciy759-
dc.identifier.pmid30202873-
dc.identifier.hkuros293276-
dc.identifier.volume68-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage1713-
dc.identifier.epage1717-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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