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Article: Atomic Force Microscopy in Characterizing Cell Mechanics for Biomedical Applications: A Review

TitleAtomic Force Microscopy in Characterizing Cell Mechanics for Biomedical Applications: A Review
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherIEEE.
Citation
IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience, 2017, v. 16, p. 523-540 How to Cite?
AbstractCell mechanics is a novel label-free biomarker for indicating cell states and pathological changes. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for quantifying the mechanical properties of single living cells in aqueous conditions. The wide use of AFM in characterizing cell mechanics in the past two decades has yielded remarkable novel insights in understanding the development and progression of certain diseases, such as cancer, showing the huge potential of cell mechanics for practical applications in the field of biomedicine. In this paper, we reviewed the utilization of AFM to characterize cell mechanics. First, the principle and method of AFM single-cell mechanical analysis was presented, along with the mechanical responses of cells to representative external stimuli measured by AFM. Next, the unique changes of cell mechanics in two types of physiological processes (stem cell differentiation, cancer metastasis) revealed by AFM were summarized. After that, the molecular mechanisms guiding cell mechanics were analyzed. Finally the challenges and future directions were discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261778
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, M-
dc.contributor.authorDang, D-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, L-
dc.contributor.authorXi, N-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-28T04:47:42Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-28T04:47:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationIEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience, 2017, v. 16, p. 523-540-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261778-
dc.description.abstractCell mechanics is a novel label-free biomarker for indicating cell states and pathological changes. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for quantifying the mechanical properties of single living cells in aqueous conditions. The wide use of AFM in characterizing cell mechanics in the past two decades has yielded remarkable novel insights in understanding the development and progression of certain diseases, such as cancer, showing the huge potential of cell mechanics for practical applications in the field of biomedicine. In this paper, we reviewed the utilization of AFM to characterize cell mechanics. First, the principle and method of AFM single-cell mechanical analysis was presented, along with the mechanical responses of cells to representative external stimuli measured by AFM. Next, the unique changes of cell mechanics in two types of physiological processes (stem cell differentiation, cancer metastasis) revealed by AFM were summarized. After that, the molecular mechanisms guiding cell mechanics were analyzed. Finally the challenges and future directions were discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherIEEE. -
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience-
dc.rightsIEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience. Copyright © IEEE.-
dc.rights©20xx IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works. -
dc.titleAtomic Force Microscopy in Characterizing Cell Mechanics for Biomedical Applications: A Review-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXi, N: xining@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXi, N=rp02044-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/TNB.2017.2714462-
dc.identifier.hkuros292772-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.spage523-
dc.identifier.epage540-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000411682900014-

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