File Download
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Cognition in Buddhist psychology : a study of the cognitive functions in the teaching of causality in early Buddhism

TitleCognition in Buddhist psychology : a study of the cognitive functions in the teaching of causality in early Buddhism
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Endo, T
Issue Date2017
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Han, T. [韓韜]. (2017). Cognition in Buddhist psychology : a study of the cognitive functions in the teaching of causality in early Buddhism. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThe analysis of mind occupies the most crucial position in the Buddha’s teachings. As the Buddha emphasized, he taught only the explanation and solution of the human predicament, i.e. dukkha. And, the key always lies in the working of the mind. No experience will exist and no liberation is possible without the mind. However, for the ignorant people, it is difficult to realize or figure out how and why the mind goes wrong, not even to mention about the way to liberate. The Buddha, therefore, patiently and consistently explained these topics by the analysis of mind. Among all the teachings, this study focuses on and investigates the analysis of cognition which explains how the mind functions in daily life according to the Pāli Nikāyas and the Chinese Āgamas. In Early Buddhism, the analysis of cognition mostly began from the impingement between the sense faculty and the sense object. Thence, starts the whole cognitive process. In this regard, the Buddha urged disciples to guard the doors of the sense faculties whenever they cognize the objects. This method is meant to monitor the whole cognitive process, to contemplate the dangers of unwholesome mental activities and so as to prevent them from arising. The analysis of cognitive process complies with the teaching of causality in essentia. Or, in other words, the teaching of causality is exemplified in the analysis of cognition. Such analysis is much diversified in length and in content in order to accommodate specific individuals or groups. Hence, the factors are mentioned due to their necessity and applicability. And, some factors obviously appear to be more essential and common. These factors, therefore, constitute the mental composition of ordinary people. This mental composition can be acquired by synthetic studies of the important discourses in different texts. Several features have been revealed on the basis of the synthetic studies. First, the analysis of cognition is empirical and pragmatic in the Buddha’s teachings. We need not resort to metaphysical or abstract doctrines, just testify these discourses by personal experience. Secondly, the relationships in the teaching of causality are not simply linear but multiple which can be sequential or simultaneous. This is because all the factors constitute a dynamic system. The mind as a whole is always acting and changing. However, the cognitive processes repeat themselves according to a basic pattern. This can be explained from the microscopic perspective of factors and from the macro perspective of processes. These factors are accord with the causal relationship to a great extent so that all ordinary people have similar reactions and experiences. Furthermore, some factors interact in a reciprocal cycle. One factor’s effect will become its cause in turn. Accordingly, the cognitive processes comprised of these factors follow a similar pattern in each round. More importantly, these factors only get stronger and worse. As a result, our cognition is the complexity of these factors, functions, and processes running repeatedly, continuously, and endlessly.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectPsychology - Buddhism
Cognition
Dept/ProgramBuddhist Studies
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261579

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorEndo, T-
dc.contributor.authorHan, Tao-
dc.contributor.author韓韜-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-22T05:33:47Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-22T05:33:47Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationHan, T. [韓韜]. (2017). Cognition in Buddhist psychology : a study of the cognitive functions in the teaching of causality in early Buddhism. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261579-
dc.description.abstractThe analysis of mind occupies the most crucial position in the Buddha’s teachings. As the Buddha emphasized, he taught only the explanation and solution of the human predicament, i.e. dukkha. And, the key always lies in the working of the mind. No experience will exist and no liberation is possible without the mind. However, for the ignorant people, it is difficult to realize or figure out how and why the mind goes wrong, not even to mention about the way to liberate. The Buddha, therefore, patiently and consistently explained these topics by the analysis of mind. Among all the teachings, this study focuses on and investigates the analysis of cognition which explains how the mind functions in daily life according to the Pāli Nikāyas and the Chinese Āgamas. In Early Buddhism, the analysis of cognition mostly began from the impingement between the sense faculty and the sense object. Thence, starts the whole cognitive process. In this regard, the Buddha urged disciples to guard the doors of the sense faculties whenever they cognize the objects. This method is meant to monitor the whole cognitive process, to contemplate the dangers of unwholesome mental activities and so as to prevent them from arising. The analysis of cognitive process complies with the teaching of causality in essentia. Or, in other words, the teaching of causality is exemplified in the analysis of cognition. Such analysis is much diversified in length and in content in order to accommodate specific individuals or groups. Hence, the factors are mentioned due to their necessity and applicability. And, some factors obviously appear to be more essential and common. These factors, therefore, constitute the mental composition of ordinary people. This mental composition can be acquired by synthetic studies of the important discourses in different texts. Several features have been revealed on the basis of the synthetic studies. First, the analysis of cognition is empirical and pragmatic in the Buddha’s teachings. We need not resort to metaphysical or abstract doctrines, just testify these discourses by personal experience. Secondly, the relationships in the teaching of causality are not simply linear but multiple which can be sequential or simultaneous. This is because all the factors constitute a dynamic system. The mind as a whole is always acting and changing. However, the cognitive processes repeat themselves according to a basic pattern. This can be explained from the microscopic perspective of factors and from the macro perspective of processes. These factors are accord with the causal relationship to a great extent so that all ordinary people have similar reactions and experiences. Furthermore, some factors interact in a reciprocal cycle. One factor’s effect will become its cause in turn. Accordingly, the cognitive processes comprised of these factors follow a similar pattern in each round. More importantly, these factors only get stronger and worse. As a result, our cognition is the complexity of these factors, functions, and processes running repeatedly, continuously, and endlessly.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshPsychology - Buddhism-
dc.subject.lcshCognition-
dc.titleCognition in Buddhist psychology : a study of the cognitive functions in the teaching of causality in early Buddhism-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineBuddhist Studies-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2017-
dc.identifier.mmsid991043979521003414-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats