File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Book Chapter: Reconstructing the Himalayan margin prior to collision with Asia: Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic geology and its implications for Cenozoic tectonics

TitleReconstructing the Himalayan margin prior to collision with Asia: Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic geology and its implications for Cenozoic tectonics
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherGeological Society of London.
Citation
Reconstructing the Himalayan margin prior to collision with Asia: Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic geology and its implications for Cenozoic tectonics. In Treloar, PJ and Searle, MP (Eds.), Himalayan Tectonics: A Modern Synthesis. London, UK: Geological Society of London, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractReconstructing the stratigraphic architecture of deposits prior to Cenozoic Himalayan uplift is critical for unravelling the structural, metamorphic, depositional and erosional history of the orogen. The nature and distribution of Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic strata have helped elucidate the relationship between lithotectonic zones, as well as the geometries of major bounding faults. Stratigraphic and geochronological work has revealed a uniform and widespread pattern of Paleoproterozoic strata >1.6 Ga that are unconformably overlain by <1.1 Ga rocks. The overlying Neoproterozoic strata record marine sedimentation, including a Cryogenian diamictite, a well-developed carbonate platform succession and condensed fossiliferous Precambrian–Cambrian boundary strata. Palaeontological study of Cambrian units permits correlation from the Indian craton through three Himalayan lithotectonic zones to a precision of within a few million years. Detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis shows the differentiation of a proximal realm of relatively condensed, nearshore, evaporite-rich units to the south and a distal realm of thick, deltaic deposits to the north. Thus, Neoproterozoic and Cambrian strata blanketed the northern Indian craton with an extensive, northward-deepening, succession. Today, these rocks are absent from parts of the inner Lesser Himalaya, and the uplift and erosion of these proximal facies explains a marked change in global seawater isotopic chemistry at 16 Ma.
DescriptionSpecial Publication 483
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259239
ISBN
Series/Report no.GSL Special Publications

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMyrow, PM-
dc.contributor.authorHughes, NC-
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, NR-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T04:03:43Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T04:03:43Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationReconstructing the Himalayan margin prior to collision with Asia: Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic geology and its implications for Cenozoic tectonics. In Treloar, PJ and Searle, MP (Eds.), Himalayan Tectonics: A Modern Synthesis. London, UK: Geological Society of London, 2019-
dc.identifier.isbn9781786204059-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259239-
dc.descriptionSpecial Publication 483-
dc.description.abstractReconstructing the stratigraphic architecture of deposits prior to Cenozoic Himalayan uplift is critical for unravelling the structural, metamorphic, depositional and erosional history of the orogen. The nature and distribution of Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic strata have helped elucidate the relationship between lithotectonic zones, as well as the geometries of major bounding faults. Stratigraphic and geochronological work has revealed a uniform and widespread pattern of Paleoproterozoic strata >1.6 Ga that are unconformably overlain by <1.1 Ga rocks. The overlying Neoproterozoic strata record marine sedimentation, including a Cryogenian diamictite, a well-developed carbonate platform succession and condensed fossiliferous Precambrian–Cambrian boundary strata. Palaeontological study of Cambrian units permits correlation from the Indian craton through three Himalayan lithotectonic zones to a precision of within a few million years. Detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis shows the differentiation of a proximal realm of relatively condensed, nearshore, evaporite-rich units to the south and a distal realm of thick, deltaic deposits to the north. Thus, Neoproterozoic and Cambrian strata blanketed the northern Indian craton with an extensive, northward-deepening, succession. Today, these rocks are absent from parts of the inner Lesser Himalaya, and the uplift and erosion of these proximal facies explains a marked change in global seawater isotopic chemistry at 16 Ma.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherGeological Society of London.-
dc.relation.ispartofHimalayan Tectonics: A Modern Synthesis-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGSL Special Publications-
dc.titleReconstructing the Himalayan margin prior to collision with Asia: Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic geology and its implications for Cenozoic tectonics-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailMcKenzie, NR: ryan00@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMcKenzie, NR=rp02198-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1144/SP483.10-
dc.identifier.hkuros289150-
dc.publisher.placeLondon, UK-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats