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Article: Short-term effects of ambient benzene and TEX (toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene combined) on cardiorespiratory mortality in Hong Kong

TitleShort-term effects of ambient benzene and TEX (toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene combined) on cardiorespiratory mortality in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsBenzene
TEX
BTEX
Cardiovascular mortality
Time series study
Issue Date2018
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envint
Citation
Environment International, 2018, v. 117, p. 91-98 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the detrimental effects of the criteria air pollutants on population health, including particulate matters, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide. However, evidence on health effects of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX in short) is insufficient. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the exposure-lag-response relations of ambient BTEX components with cardiorespiratory mortality in Hong Kong population. Methods Daily BTEX concentrations from April 2011 to December 2014 were collected from the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department. Cause-specific mortality records were obtained from the Census and Statistics Department of Hong Kong. Generalized additive model (GAM) integrated with a distributed lag model (DLM) was used to estimate the excess risks of cardiorespiratory mortality associated with the cumulative exposure to benzene and TEX (toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene combined) over 0–9 lag days, while adjusting for time trend, seasonality, weather conditions and calendar effects. Results We observed the delayed and distributed lag effects of BTEX components on circulatory mortality. The cumulative exposures over 0–9 lag days for IQR increments of benzene (1.4 μg/m3) and TEX (7.9 μg/m3) were associated with 5.8% (95%CI: 1.0% to 10.8%) and 3.5% (95%CI: 1.0% to 6.1%) increases in circulatory mortality, respectively. The effect estimates of benzene and TEX were more delayed than that of PM2.5. We didn't observe any significant association of BTEX exposure on total and respiratory deaths. Conclusions Short-term elevations in ambient BTEX concentrations may trigger circulatory mortality in Hong Kong population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258983
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 7.297
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.684
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRan, J-
dc.contributor.authorQiu, H-
dc.contributor.authorSun, S-
dc.contributor.authorTian, L-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T03:59:36Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T03:59:36Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment International, 2018, v. 117, p. 91-98-
dc.identifier.issn0160-4120-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258983-
dc.description.abstractBackground Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the detrimental effects of the criteria air pollutants on population health, including particulate matters, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide. However, evidence on health effects of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX in short) is insufficient. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the exposure-lag-response relations of ambient BTEX components with cardiorespiratory mortality in Hong Kong population. Methods Daily BTEX concentrations from April 2011 to December 2014 were collected from the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department. Cause-specific mortality records were obtained from the Census and Statistics Department of Hong Kong. Generalized additive model (GAM) integrated with a distributed lag model (DLM) was used to estimate the excess risks of cardiorespiratory mortality associated with the cumulative exposure to benzene and TEX (toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene combined) over 0–9 lag days, while adjusting for time trend, seasonality, weather conditions and calendar effects. Results We observed the delayed and distributed lag effects of BTEX components on circulatory mortality. The cumulative exposures over 0–9 lag days for IQR increments of benzene (1.4 μg/m3) and TEX (7.9 μg/m3) were associated with 5.8% (95%CI: 1.0% to 10.8%) and 3.5% (95%CI: 1.0% to 6.1%) increases in circulatory mortality, respectively. The effect estimates of benzene and TEX were more delayed than that of PM2.5. We didn't observe any significant association of BTEX exposure on total and respiratory deaths. Conclusions Short-term elevations in ambient BTEX concentrations may trigger circulatory mortality in Hong Kong population.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envint-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment International-
dc.subjectBenzene-
dc.subjectTEX-
dc.subjectBTEX-
dc.subjectCardiovascular mortality-
dc.subjectTime series study-
dc.titleShort-term effects of ambient benzene and TEX (toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene combined) on cardiorespiratory mortality in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailQiu, H: qiuhong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTian, L: linweit@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, L=rp01991-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envint.2018.04.049-
dc.identifier.hkuros289569-
dc.identifier.volume117-
dc.identifier.spage91-
dc.identifier.epage98-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000436573400011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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