File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Neurodevelopmental changes in the relationship between stress perception and prefrontal-amygdala functional circuitry

TitleNeurodevelopmental changes in the relationship between stress perception and prefrontal-amygdala functional circuitry
Authors
KeywordsAmygdala, brain development
Brain development
Dynamic causal modeling
Resting-state functional connectivity
Stress
Issue Date2018
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.elsevier.com/neuroimage-clinical/
Citation
NeuroImage: Clinical, 2018, v. 20, p. 267-274 How to Cite?
AbstractOur brain during distinct developmental phases may show differential responses to perceived psychological stress, yet existing research specifically examining neurodevelopmental changes in stress processing is scarce. To fill in this research gap, this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study examined the relationship between perceived stress and resting-state neural connectivity patterns among 67 healthy volunteers belonging to three age groups (adolescents, young adults and adults), who were supposed to be at separate neurodevelopmental phases and exhibit different affect regulatory processes in the brain. While the groups showed no significant difference in self-reported general perceived stress levels, the functional connectivity between amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) was positively and negatively correlated with perceived stress in adolescents and young adults respectively, while no significant correlations were observed in adults. Furthermore, among adolescents, the causal functional interaction between amygdala and vmPFC exhibited bottom-up connectivity, and that between amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex exhibited top-down connectivity, both of which changed to bilateral directions, i.e. both bottom-up and top-down connections, in both young adults and adults, supporting the notion that the amygdala and prefrontal cortical circuitries undergo functional reorganizations during brain development. These novel findings have important clinical implications in treating stress-related affective disorders in young individuals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258908
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.869
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.145
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, J-
dc.contributor.authorGeng, X-
dc.contributor.authorShao, Z-
dc.contributor.authorWong, N-
dc.contributor.authorTao, J-
dc.contributor.authorChen, L-
dc.contributor.authorChan, C-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T03:57:53Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T03:57:53Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationNeuroImage: Clinical, 2018, v. 20, p. 267-274-
dc.identifier.issn2213-1582-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258908-
dc.description.abstractOur brain during distinct developmental phases may show differential responses to perceived psychological stress, yet existing research specifically examining neurodevelopmental changes in stress processing is scarce. To fill in this research gap, this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study examined the relationship between perceived stress and resting-state neural connectivity patterns among 67 healthy volunteers belonging to three age groups (adolescents, young adults and adults), who were supposed to be at separate neurodevelopmental phases and exhibit different affect regulatory processes in the brain. While the groups showed no significant difference in self-reported general perceived stress levels, the functional connectivity between amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) was positively and negatively correlated with perceived stress in adolescents and young adults respectively, while no significant correlations were observed in adults. Furthermore, among adolescents, the causal functional interaction between amygdala and vmPFC exhibited bottom-up connectivity, and that between amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex exhibited top-down connectivity, both of which changed to bilateral directions, i.e. both bottom-up and top-down connections, in both young adults and adults, supporting the notion that the amygdala and prefrontal cortical circuitries undergo functional reorganizations during brain development. These novel findings have important clinical implications in treating stress-related affective disorders in young individuals.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.elsevier.com/neuroimage-clinical/-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImage: Clinical-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectAmygdala, brain development-
dc.subjectBrain development-
dc.subjectDynamic causal modeling-
dc.subjectResting-state functional connectivity-
dc.subjectStress-
dc.titleNeurodevelopmental changes in the relationship between stress perception and prefrontal-amygdala functional circuitry-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWu, J: jswu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailShao, Z: rshao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGeng, X=rp01678-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nicl.2018.07.022-
dc.identifier.pmid30101058-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6084015-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85050888159-
dc.identifier.hkuros287780-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.spage267-
dc.identifier.epage274-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000450799000030-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats