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postgraduate thesis: Heterophilous community of practice for moodle adoptionin higher education

TitleHeterophilous community of practice for moodle adoptionin higher education
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Yum, T. [任天培]. (2017). Heterophilous community of practice for moodle adoptionin higher education. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractSuccessful educational technologies adoptions require systemic change (Law, Yuen & Fox, 2011). The concept of community of practice (CoP) fits the need by aggregating different individuals and forming heterophilous social settings. However, heterophilous CoP confronts with our communication habit and social nature, especially in the context of higher education. A heterophilous CoP for Moodle adoption at a university in Hong Kong was observed for 7 months. The process of social learning among participants with different backgrounds and levels of participation was explored through modes of belonging (Wenger, 1998) and heterophily (Rogers and Bhowmik, 1970). Data were collected by questionnaires, field notes and individual interviews during and after 8 sharing sessions in this CoP. 56 questionnaires were collected. 7 participants were selected for interview based on the results from questionnaires and field notes to represent a wide range of backgrounds. The results from questionnaires and interviews were compared to describe the influence of heterophily on different participants in this CoP. Participants with different backgrounds were found in this CoP. They perceived heterophily in different areas with different degrees. Heterophily provided references and different meanings to participants. Participants learnt through participation by transforming heterophily into learning outcomes with different modes of belonging. Relevant experiences were essential in the learning process. This study argued that educational technologies practices and heterophilous CoP are related. Also, a mechanism was proposed to describe how different participants learn through participation in heterophilous CoP. Building heterophilous CoP is potentially beneficial for educational technologies adoptions. It should be aware that inexperienced participants might encounter difficulties in learning. Participants are also suggested to participate with different modes of belonging which are crucial for social learning in heterophilous CoP.
DegreeMaster of Science in Information Technology in Education
SubjectEducation, Higher - Computer-assisted instruction
Educational technology
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258798

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYum, Tin-pui-
dc.contributor.author任天培-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T02:30:19Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-22T02:30:19Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationYum, T. [任天培]. (2017). Heterophilous community of practice for moodle adoptionin higher education. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258798-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful educational technologies adoptions require systemic change (Law, Yuen & Fox, 2011). The concept of community of practice (CoP) fits the need by aggregating different individuals and forming heterophilous social settings. However, heterophilous CoP confronts with our communication habit and social nature, especially in the context of higher education. A heterophilous CoP for Moodle adoption at a university in Hong Kong was observed for 7 months. The process of social learning among participants with different backgrounds and levels of participation was explored through modes of belonging (Wenger, 1998) and heterophily (Rogers and Bhowmik, 1970). Data were collected by questionnaires, field notes and individual interviews during and after 8 sharing sessions in this CoP. 56 questionnaires were collected. 7 participants were selected for interview based on the results from questionnaires and field notes to represent a wide range of backgrounds. The results from questionnaires and interviews were compared to describe the influence of heterophily on different participants in this CoP. Participants with different backgrounds were found in this CoP. They perceived heterophily in different areas with different degrees. Heterophily provided references and different meanings to participants. Participants learnt through participation by transforming heterophily into learning outcomes with different modes of belonging. Relevant experiences were essential in the learning process. This study argued that educational technologies practices and heterophilous CoP are related. Also, a mechanism was proposed to describe how different participants learn through participation in heterophilous CoP. Building heterophilous CoP is potentially beneficial for educational technologies adoptions. It should be aware that inexperienced participants might encounter difficulties in learning. Participants are also suggested to participate with different modes of belonging which are crucial for social learning in heterophilous CoP. -
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshEducation, Higher - Computer-assisted instruction-
dc.subject.lcshEducational technology-
dc.titleHeterophilous community of practice for moodle adoptionin higher education-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Science in Information Technology in Education-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2017-
dc.identifier.mmsid991044020098603414-

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