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Article: MERS coronaviruses from camels in Africa exhibit region-dependent genetic diversity

TitleMERS coronaviruses from camels in Africa exhibit region-dependent genetic diversity
Authors
KeywordsAfrica
Coronavirus
Evolution
MERS
Zoonosis
Issue Date2018
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2018, v. 115 n. 12, p. 3144-3149 How to Cite?
AbstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a zoonotic respiratory disease of global public health concern, and dromedary camels are the only proven source of zoonotic infection. Although MERS-CoV infection is ubiquitous in dromedaries across Africa as well as in the Arabian Peninsula, zoonotic disease appears confined to the Arabian Peninsula. MERS-CoVs from Africa have hitherto been poorly studied. We genetically and phenotypically characterized MERS-CoV from dromedaries sampled in Morocco, Burkina Faso, Nigeria, and Ethiopia. Viruses from Africa (clade C) are phylogenetically distinct from contemporary viruses from the Arabian Peninsula (clades A and B) but remain antigenically similar in microneutralization tests. Viruses from West (Nigeria, Burkina Faso) and North (Morocco) Africa form a subclade, C1, that shares clade-defining genetic signatures including deletions in the accessory gene ORF4b Compared with human and camel MERS-CoV from Saudi Arabia, virus isolates from Burkina Faso (BF785) and Nigeria (Nig1657) had lower virus replication competence in Calu-3 cells and in ex vivo cultures of human bronchus and lung. BF785 replicated to lower titer in lungs of human DPP4-transduced mice. A reverse genetics-derived recombinant MERS-CoV (EMC) lacking ORF4b elicited higher type I and III IFN responses than the isogenic EMC virus in Calu-3 cells. However, ORF4b deletions may not be the major determinant of the reduced replication competence of BF785 and Nig1657. Genetic and phenotypic differences in West African viruses may be relevant to zoonotic potential. There is an urgent need for studies of MERS-CoV at the animal-human interface.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258334
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 9.504
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, KW-
dc.contributor.authorHui, PY-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorMiguel, E-
dc.contributor.authorNiemeyer, D-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, J-
dc.contributor.authorChannappanavar, R-
dc.contributor.authorDudas, G-
dc.contributor.authorOladipo, JO-
dc.contributor.authorTraoré, A-
dc.contributor.authorFassi-Fihri, O-
dc.contributor.authorAli, A-
dc.contributor.authorDemissié, GF-
dc.contributor.authorMuth, D-
dc.contributor.authorChan, MCW-
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, JM-
dc.contributor.authorMeyerholz, DK-
dc.contributor.authorKuranga, SA-
dc.contributor.authorMamo, G-
dc.contributor.authorZHOU, Z-
dc.contributor.authorSO, TY-
dc.contributor.authorHemida, MG-
dc.contributor.authorWebby, RJ-
dc.contributor.authorRoger, F-
dc.contributor.authorRambaut, A-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LML-
dc.contributor.authorPerlman, S-
dc.contributor.authorDrosten, C-
dc.contributor.authorChevalier, V-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T01:36:49Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-22T01:36:49Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2018, v. 115 n. 12, p. 3144-3149-
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258334-
dc.description.abstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a zoonotic respiratory disease of global public health concern, and dromedary camels are the only proven source of zoonotic infection. Although MERS-CoV infection is ubiquitous in dromedaries across Africa as well as in the Arabian Peninsula, zoonotic disease appears confined to the Arabian Peninsula. MERS-CoVs from Africa have hitherto been poorly studied. We genetically and phenotypically characterized MERS-CoV from dromedaries sampled in Morocco, Burkina Faso, Nigeria, and Ethiopia. Viruses from Africa (clade C) are phylogenetically distinct from contemporary viruses from the Arabian Peninsula (clades A and B) but remain antigenically similar in microneutralization tests. Viruses from West (Nigeria, Burkina Faso) and North (Morocco) Africa form a subclade, C1, that shares clade-defining genetic signatures including deletions in the accessory gene ORF4b Compared with human and camel MERS-CoV from Saudi Arabia, virus isolates from Burkina Faso (BF785) and Nigeria (Nig1657) had lower virus replication competence in Calu-3 cells and in ex vivo cultures of human bronchus and lung. BF785 replicated to lower titer in lungs of human DPP4-transduced mice. A reverse genetics-derived recombinant MERS-CoV (EMC) lacking ORF4b elicited higher type I and III IFN responses than the isogenic EMC virus in Calu-3 cells. However, ORF4b deletions may not be the major determinant of the reduced replication competence of BF785 and Nig1657. Genetic and phenotypic differences in West African viruses may be relevant to zoonotic potential. There is an urgent need for studies of MERS-CoV at the animal-human interface.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences-
dc.rightsProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectAfrica-
dc.subjectCoronavirus-
dc.subjectEvolution-
dc.subjectMERS-
dc.subjectZoonosis-
dc.titleMERS coronaviruses from camels in Africa exhibit region-dependent genetic diversity-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChu, KW: dkwchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, PY: kenrie@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, MCW: mchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, JM: jmnichol@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LML: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, PY=rp02149-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, MCW=rp00420-
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, JM=rp00364-
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LML=rp00484-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1718769115-
dc.identifier.pmid29507189-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5866576-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85044278309-
dc.identifier.hkuros286573-
dc.identifier.volume115-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage3144-
dc.identifier.epage3149-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000427829500085-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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