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Conference Paper: Rethinking the Rise of Confucianism in Medieval Korea

TitleRethinking the Rise of Confucianism in Medieval Korea
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSchool of Modern Languages and Cultures, The University of Hong Kong.
Citation
Seminar, School of Modern Languages and Cultures, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 17 September 2014  How to Cite?
AbstractThis talk examines the birth and growth of Korean Confucianism as an independent tradition outside of China as an unusual development. Historically, only a handful of societies and cultures managed to abstract the Confucian tradition from its sacred connection with “China” and “Chineseness”. How did the Koreans adopt an intellectual tradition that was not designed to be exported? The rise of Confucianism in medieval Korea took place in three stages: (1) initial experimentation despite protests against its foreign origins; (2) gradual localization alongside other competing traditions; and (3) emergence of a hybrid Sino-Korean Confucian nativism as an exclusive ideology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257843

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCha, JJ-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T08:10:43Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-15T08:10:43Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationSeminar, School of Modern Languages and Cultures, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 17 September 2014 -
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257843-
dc.description.abstractThis talk examines the birth and growth of Korean Confucianism as an independent tradition outside of China as an unusual development. Historically, only a handful of societies and cultures managed to abstract the Confucian tradition from its sacred connection with “China” and “Chineseness”. How did the Koreans adopt an intellectual tradition that was not designed to be exported? The rise of Confucianism in medieval Korea took place in three stages: (1) initial experimentation despite protests against its foreign origins; (2) gradual localization alongside other competing traditions; and (3) emergence of a hybrid Sino-Korean Confucian nativism as an exclusive ideology.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSchool of Modern Languages and Cultures, The University of Hong Kong. -
dc.relation.ispartofSeminar, School of Modern Languages and Cultures, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong-
dc.titleRethinking the Rise of Confucianism in Medieval Korea-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailCha, JJ: javierc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.hkuros250092-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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