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Article: Anomalously low electronic thermal conductivity in metallic vanadium dioxide

TitleAnomalously low electronic thermal conductivity in metallic vanadium dioxide
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.org
Citation
Science, 2017, v. 355 n. 6323, p. 371-374 How to Cite?
AbstractIn electrically conductive solids, the Wiedemann-Franz law requires the electronic contribution to thermal conductivity to be proportional to electrical conductivity. Violations of the Wiedemann-Franz law are typically an indication of unconventional quasiparticle dynamics, such as inelastic scattering, or hydrodynamic collective motion of charge carriers, typically pronounced only at cryogenic temperatures. We report an order-of-magnitude breakdown of the Wiedemann-Franz law at high temperatures ranging from 240 to 340 kelvin in metallic vanadium dioxide in the vicinity of its metal-insulator transition. Different from previously established mechanisms, the unusually low electronic thermal conductivity is a signature of the absence of quasiparticles in a strongly correlated electron fluid where heat and charge diffuse independently.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257368
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 41.058
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 13.217

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, S-
dc.contributor.authorHippalgaonkar, K-
dc.contributor.authorYang, F-
dc.contributor.authorHong, J-
dc.contributor.authorKo, C-
dc.contributor.authorSuh, J-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, K-
dc.contributor.authorWang, K-
dc.contributor.authorUrban, JJ-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, X-
dc.contributor.authorDames, C-
dc.contributor.authorHartnoll, SA-
dc.contributor.authorDelaire, O-
dc.contributor.authorWu, J-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T08:17:05Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-27T08:17:05Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationScience, 2017, v. 355 n. 6323, p. 371-374-
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257368-
dc.description.abstractIn electrically conductive solids, the Wiedemann-Franz law requires the electronic contribution to thermal conductivity to be proportional to electrical conductivity. Violations of the Wiedemann-Franz law are typically an indication of unconventional quasiparticle dynamics, such as inelastic scattering, or hydrodynamic collective motion of charge carriers, typically pronounced only at cryogenic temperatures. We report an order-of-magnitude breakdown of the Wiedemann-Franz law at high temperatures ranging from 240 to 340 kelvin in metallic vanadium dioxide in the vicinity of its metal-insulator transition. Different from previously established mechanisms, the unusually low electronic thermal conductivity is a signature of the absence of quasiparticles in a strongly correlated electron fluid where heat and charge diffuse independently.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.org-
dc.relation.ispartofScience-
dc.rightsScience. Copyright © American Association for the Advancement of Science.-
dc.rightsThis is the author’s version of the work. It is posted here by permission of the AAAS for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in [Science Journal Title] on [Volume number and date], DOI: [insert DOI number].-
dc.titleAnomalously low electronic thermal conductivity in metallic vanadium dioxide-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, X: president@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, X=rp02411-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.aag0410-
dc.identifier.pmid28126811-
dc.identifier.volume355-
dc.identifier.issue6323-
dc.identifier.spage371-
dc.identifier.epage374-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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