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Article: Climate shocks and sino-Nomadic conflict

TitleClimate shocks and sino-Nomadic conflict
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Review of Economics and Statistics, 2011, v. 93, n. 3, p. 970-981 How to Cite?
AbstractEmploying droughts and floods to proxy for changes in precipitation, this paper shows nomadic incursions into settled Han Chinese regions over a period of more than two thousand years-the most enduring clash of civilizations in history-to be positively correlated with less rainfall and negatively correlated with more rainfall. Consistent with findings that economic shocks are positively correlated with conflicts in modern sub-Saharan Africa when instrumented by rainfall, our reduced-form results extend this relationship to a very different temporal and geographical context, the Asian continent, and long historical period. © 2011 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257082
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.979
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.629

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBai, Ying-
dc.contributor.authorKung, James Kai Sing-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-24T08:58:47Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-24T08:58:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationReview of Economics and Statistics, 2011, v. 93, n. 3, p. 970-981-
dc.identifier.issn0034-6535-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257082-
dc.description.abstractEmploying droughts and floods to proxy for changes in precipitation, this paper shows nomadic incursions into settled Han Chinese regions over a period of more than two thousand years-the most enduring clash of civilizations in history-to be positively correlated with less rainfall and negatively correlated with more rainfall. Consistent with findings that economic shocks are positively correlated with conflicts in modern sub-Saharan Africa when instrumented by rainfall, our reduced-form results extend this relationship to a very different temporal and geographical context, the Asian continent, and long historical period. © 2011 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofReview of Economics and Statistics-
dc.titleClimate shocks and sino-Nomadic conflict-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/REST_a_00106-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054001274-
dc.identifier.volume93-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage970-
dc.identifier.epage981-
dc.identifier.eissn1530-9142-

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