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Moving Image: Unlocking the criminal mind : the biosocial keys

TitleUnlocking the criminal mind : the biosocial keys
Editors
Editor(s):Raine, Adrian
Issue Date2005
AbstractIs there a natural born killer? Do bad brains cause bad behavior? And if so, what are we going to do about it? With increasing frequency, research suggests there is no single, simple answer to questions regarding criminal behaviour. Studies of murderers, psychopaths, and aggressive children are increasingly implicating birth complications, structural and functional brain deficits, genetic abnormalities, and poor nutrition as causes of crime. It is argued that the future key to curing crime lies in a more complex integration of biological and social knowledge, but this in turn raises important ethical and legal questions regarding our concepts of free will, moral responsibility, and punishment
DescriptionLive recording from a public lecture organized by Department of Psychology, HKU held on 29 April 2005 at the University of Hong Kong
Speaker: Adrian Raine (Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program University of Southern California, USA)
SubjectCriminal anthropology
Criminal psychology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/25650
Other Identifiers

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.editorRaine, Adrianen_HK
dc.creatorUniversity of Hong Kong. Dept. of Psychologyen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-28T04:44:04Z-
dc.date.available2006-06-28T04:44:04Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifierhttp://evideo.lib.hku.hk/play/3119953en_HK
dc.identifier.otherocm61715361en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/25650-
dc.descriptionLive recording from a public lecture organized by Department of Psychology, HKU held on 29 April 2005 at the University of Hong Kongen_HK
dc.descriptionSpeaker: Adrian Raine (Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program University of Southern California, USA)en_HK
dc.description.abstractIs there a natural born killer? Do bad brains cause bad behavior? And if so, what are we going to do about it? With increasing frequency, research suggests there is no single, simple answer to questions regarding criminal behaviour. Studies of murderers, psychopaths, and aggressive children are increasingly implicating birth complications, structural and functional brain deficits, genetic abnormalities, and poor nutrition as causes of crime. It is argued that the future key to curing crime lies in a more complex integration of biological and social knowledge, but this in turn raises important ethical and legal questions regarding our concepts of free will, moral responsibility, and punishmenten_HK
dc.format.extent1 videodisc (ca. 95 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 inen_HK
dc.format.extent372 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypevideo/x-ms-wmven_HK
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofhttp://evideo.lib.hku.hken_HK
dc.rightsHKU students and staff onlyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.ddc364.2 U58en_HK
dc.subject.lcshCriminal anthropologyen_HK
dc.subject.lcshCriminal psychologyen_HK
dc.titleUnlocking the criminal mind : the biosocial keysen_HK
dc.typeMoving_Imageen_HK
dc.identifier.hkulb3119953en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK

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