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Article: Resting-state fMRI signals in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder at the high-risk and ultra-high-risk stages and their relations with cognitive function

TitleResting-state fMRI signals in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder at the high-risk and ultra-high-risk stages and their relations with cognitive function
Authors
KeywordsBipolar disorder
High-risk offspring
Ultra-high-risk offspring
Resting-state fMRI
Limbic network
Cerebellum
Issue Date2018
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpsychires
Citation
Journal of Psychiatric Research, 2018, v. 98, p. 99-106 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder (BD) has been associated with dysfunctional resting-state brain functioning. However, it is still not known whether the aberrant functioning occurs and predict cognitive functioning before illness onset. AIMS: We examined the resting-state regional and network dysfunctioning, and their correlates with neurocognitive performance, in the high-risk (HR) and ultra-high-risk (UHR) stages of bipolar disorder. METHODS: Using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF), region homogeneity (ReHo) and hypothesis-driven region-of-interest (ROI)-based connectivity, we examined resting-state fMRI data of 8- to 25-year-old healthy offspring (HR, n = 28) and offspring with subthreshold syndromes (UHR, n = 22) of a BD parent, and age-matched healthy controls without any personal or family psychopathology (HC, n = 46). Participants' neurocognitive profiles were assessed using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB). RESULTS: ALFF signals in the left putamen and right rolandic operculum were lower in the HR group compared to the HC group. In contrast, ALFF signals were increased in the UHR group in the right middle pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus, right calcarine sulcus and right cerebellum. Connectivities between the right amygdala and left inferior temporal gyrus, between the left hippocampus and inferior occipital gyrus, and between the left hippocampus and middle pars orbitalis gyrus were decreased in the HR group compared to the HC group. In UHR versus HC group, connectivity between the right amygdala and the left hippocampus and left insula was increased, and connectivity between the left hippocampus and the left insula and the cerebellum was also increased. Among cognitive measures, processing speed was positively correlated with ALFF signals in the left putamen in the HR offspring. In the UHR offspring, processing speed, attention, and verbal learning/memory were positively correlated with the functional connectivity between the left hippocampus and cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: Offspring of parents with BD in the HR and UHR stages show largely non-overlapping patterns of atypical resting-state signals and functional connectivity that predicted cognitive functioning, possibly reflecting inherited abnormalities and/or complimentary reactions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256242
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.265

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, K-
dc.contributor.authorShao, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLu, R-
dc.contributor.authorChen, K-
dc.contributor.authorLu, W-
dc.contributor.authorLi, T-
dc.contributor.authorKong, J-
dc.contributor.authorSo, KF-
dc.contributor.authorXu, G-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-20T06:31:34Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-20T06:31:34Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Psychiatric Research, 2018, v. 98, p. 99-106-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3956-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256242-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder (BD) has been associated with dysfunctional resting-state brain functioning. However, it is still not known whether the aberrant functioning occurs and predict cognitive functioning before illness onset. AIMS: We examined the resting-state regional and network dysfunctioning, and their correlates with neurocognitive performance, in the high-risk (HR) and ultra-high-risk (UHR) stages of bipolar disorder. METHODS: Using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF), region homogeneity (ReHo) and hypothesis-driven region-of-interest (ROI)-based connectivity, we examined resting-state fMRI data of 8- to 25-year-old healthy offspring (HR, n = 28) and offspring with subthreshold syndromes (UHR, n = 22) of a BD parent, and age-matched healthy controls without any personal or family psychopathology (HC, n = 46). Participants' neurocognitive profiles were assessed using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB). RESULTS: ALFF signals in the left putamen and right rolandic operculum were lower in the HR group compared to the HC group. In contrast, ALFF signals were increased in the UHR group in the right middle pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus, right calcarine sulcus and right cerebellum. Connectivities between the right amygdala and left inferior temporal gyrus, between the left hippocampus and inferior occipital gyrus, and between the left hippocampus and middle pars orbitalis gyrus were decreased in the HR group compared to the HC group. In UHR versus HC group, connectivity between the right amygdala and the left hippocampus and left insula was increased, and connectivity between the left hippocampus and the left insula and the cerebellum was also increased. Among cognitive measures, processing speed was positively correlated with ALFF signals in the left putamen in the HR offspring. In the UHR offspring, processing speed, attention, and verbal learning/memory were positively correlated with the functional connectivity between the left hippocampus and cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: Offspring of parents with BD in the HR and UHR stages show largely non-overlapping patterns of atypical resting-state signals and functional connectivity that predicted cognitive functioning, possibly reflecting inherited abnormalities and/or complimentary reactions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpsychires-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Psychiatric Research-
dc.subjectBipolar disorder-
dc.subjectHigh-risk offspring-
dc.subjectUltra-high-risk offspring-
dc.subjectResting-state fMRI-
dc.subjectLimbic network-
dc.subjectCerebellum-
dc.titleResting-state fMRI signals in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder at the high-risk and ultra-high-risk stages and their relations with cognitive function-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailShao, Z: rshao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.01.001-
dc.identifier.pmid29331931-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85040332603-
dc.identifier.hkuros286123-
dc.identifier.volume98-
dc.identifier.spage99-
dc.identifier.epage106-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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