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Article: Illness, at-risk and resilience neural markers of early-stage bipolar disorder

TitleIllness, at-risk and resilience neural markers of early-stage bipolar disorder
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
Citation
Journal of Affective Disorders, 2018, v. 238, p. 16-23 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Current knowledge on objective and specific neural markers for bipolar risk and resilience-related processes is lacking, partly due to not subdividing high-risk individuals manifesting different levels of subclinical symptoms who possibly possess different levels of resilience. METHODS: We delineated grey matter markers for bipolar illness, genetic high risk (endophenotype) and resilience, through comparing across 42 young non-comorbid bipolar patients, 42 healthy controls, and 72 diagnosis-free, medication-naive high-genetic-risk individuals subdivided into a combined-high-risk group who additionally manifested bipolar risk-relevant subsyndromes (N = 38), and an asymptomatic high-risk group (N = 34). Complementary analyses assessed the additional predictive and classification values of grey matter markers beyond those of clinical scores, through using logistic regression and support vector machine analyses. RESULTS: Illness-related effects manifested as reduced grey matter volumes of bilateral temporal limbic-striatal and cerebellar regions, which significantly differentiated bipolar patients from healthy controls and improved clinical classification specificity by 20%. Reduced bilateral cerebellar grey matter volume emerged as a potential endophenotype and (along with parieto-occipital grey matter changes) separated combined-high-risk individuals from healthy and high-risk individuals, and increased clinical classification specificity by approximately 10% and 27%, respectively, while the relatively normalized cerebellar grey matter volumes in the high-risk sample may confer resilience. LIMITATIONS: The cross-validation procedure was not performed on an independent sample using independently-derived features. The BD group had different age and sex distributions than some other groups which may not be fully addressable statistically. CONCLUSIONS: Our framework can be applied in other measurement domains to derive complete profiles for bipolar patients and at-risk individuals, towards forming strategies for promoting resilience and preclinical intervention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256195
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.786
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.927

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, K-
dc.contributor.authorShao, Z-
dc.contributor.authorGeng, X-
dc.contributor.authorChen, K-
dc.contributor.authorLu, R-
dc.contributor.authorGao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorBi, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLu, W-
dc.contributor.authorGuan, L-
dc.contributor.authorKong, J-
dc.contributor.authorXu, G-
dc.contributor.authorSo, KF-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-20T06:30:49Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-20T06:30:49Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Affective Disorders, 2018, v. 238, p. 16-23-
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256195-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Current knowledge on objective and specific neural markers for bipolar risk and resilience-related processes is lacking, partly due to not subdividing high-risk individuals manifesting different levels of subclinical symptoms who possibly possess different levels of resilience. METHODS: We delineated grey matter markers for bipolar illness, genetic high risk (endophenotype) and resilience, through comparing across 42 young non-comorbid bipolar patients, 42 healthy controls, and 72 diagnosis-free, medication-naive high-genetic-risk individuals subdivided into a combined-high-risk group who additionally manifested bipolar risk-relevant subsyndromes (N = 38), and an asymptomatic high-risk group (N = 34). Complementary analyses assessed the additional predictive and classification values of grey matter markers beyond those of clinical scores, through using logistic regression and support vector machine analyses. RESULTS: Illness-related effects manifested as reduced grey matter volumes of bilateral temporal limbic-striatal and cerebellar regions, which significantly differentiated bipolar patients from healthy controls and improved clinical classification specificity by 20%. Reduced bilateral cerebellar grey matter volume emerged as a potential endophenotype and (along with parieto-occipital grey matter changes) separated combined-high-risk individuals from healthy and high-risk individuals, and increased clinical classification specificity by approximately 10% and 27%, respectively, while the relatively normalized cerebellar grey matter volumes in the high-risk sample may confer resilience. LIMITATIONS: The cross-validation procedure was not performed on an independent sample using independently-derived features. The BD group had different age and sex distributions than some other groups which may not be fully addressable statistically. CONCLUSIONS: Our framework can be applied in other measurement domains to derive complete profiles for bipolar patients and at-risk individuals, towards forming strategies for promoting resilience and preclinical intervention.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disorders-
dc.titleIllness, at-risk and resilience neural markers of early-stage bipolar disorder-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailShao, Z: rshao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2018.05.017-
dc.identifier.hkuros286126-
dc.identifier.volume238-
dc.identifier.spage16-
dc.identifier.epage23-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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