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Article: Microbial diversity and evidence of novel homoacetogens in the gut of both geriatric and adult giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

TitleMicrobial diversity and evidence of novel homoacetogens in the gut of both geriatric and adult giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2014, v. 9, n. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent studies have described the bacterial community residing in the guts of giant pandas, together with the presence of lignocellulolytic enzymes. However, a more comprehensive understanding of the intestinal microbial composition and its functional capacity in giant pandas remains a major goal. Here, we conducted a comparison of bacterial, fungal and homoacetogenic microbial communities from fecal samples taken from two geriatric and two adult captive giant pandas. 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing revealed that Firmicutes and Proteobacteria are the most abundant microbiota in both geriatric and adult giant pandas. However, members of phylum Actinobacteria found in adult giant pandas were absent in their geriatric counterparts. Similarly, ITS1 amplicon pyrosequencing identified developmental changes in the most abundant fungal classes from Sordariomycetes in adult pandas to Saccharomycetes in geriatric pandas. Geriatric pandas exhibited significantly higher abundance of a potential probiotic fungus (Candida tropicalis) as compared to adult pandas, indicating their importance in the normal digestive physiology of aged pandas. Our study also reported the presence of a lignocellulolytic white-rot fungus, Perenniporia medulla-panis, and the evidence of novel homoacetogens residing in the guts of giant pandas. © 2014 Tun et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/254543

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTun, Hein Min-
dc.contributor.authorMauroo, Nathalie France-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Chan San-
dc.contributor.authorHo, John Chi Wang-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Mabel Ting-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Frederick Chi Ching-
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-19T15:40:50Z-
dc.date.available2018-06-19T15:40:50Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2014, v. 9, n. 1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/254543-
dc.description.abstractRecent studies have described the bacterial community residing in the guts of giant pandas, together with the presence of lignocellulolytic enzymes. However, a more comprehensive understanding of the intestinal microbial composition and its functional capacity in giant pandas remains a major goal. Here, we conducted a comparison of bacterial, fungal and homoacetogenic microbial communities from fecal samples taken from two geriatric and two adult captive giant pandas. 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing revealed that Firmicutes and Proteobacteria are the most abundant microbiota in both geriatric and adult giant pandas. However, members of phylum Actinobacteria found in adult giant pandas were absent in their geriatric counterparts. Similarly, ITS1 amplicon pyrosequencing identified developmental changes in the most abundant fungal classes from Sordariomycetes in adult pandas to Saccharomycetes in geriatric pandas. Geriatric pandas exhibited significantly higher abundance of a potential probiotic fungus (Candida tropicalis) as compared to adult pandas, indicating their importance in the normal digestive physiology of aged pandas. Our study also reported the presence of a lignocellulolytic white-rot fungus, Perenniporia medulla-panis, and the evidence of novel homoacetogens residing in the guts of giant pandas. © 2014 Tun et al.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.titleMicrobial diversity and evidence of novel homoacetogens in the gut of both geriatric and adult giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0079902-
dc.identifier.pmid24475017-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84900328997-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-

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