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Article: How are Foreign Policy Decisions Made in China?

TitleHow are Foreign Policy Decisions Made in China?
Authors
KeywordsChinese foreign policy
Chinese foreign policy actors
Chinese political fragmentation
Chinese political system
Foreign policy decision-making
Xi Jinping administration
Issue Date2016
Citation
Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, 2016, v. 3, n. 1, p. 101-110 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2016 The Authors. Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies published by Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. The growing number of actors involved in China's international activities has led to fractured authority in foreign policy decision-making. Actors vie for the attention of senior officials to promote their interests on any specific issue. As a result, decision making is often a slow process; there are multiple channels of information, and actors appeal to public opinion to support their claims. Since 2012, Xi Jinping has taken charge of all foreign policy related decision-making bodies in what appears to be an attempt to improve coordination of interest groups. A slight shift to a more personified foreign policy than during the Hu or Jiang eras has also taken place. In this paper, we describe how foreign policy decisions should be made in China according to formal rules; next, we take into account the reality of how the Chinese political system deals with China's evolving international role. We conclude by assessing the risks of fragmentation, on the one hand, and Xi's efforts to recentralise foreign policy, on the other hand.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251723
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJakobson, Linda-
dc.contributor.authorManuel, Ryan-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-14T03:39:00Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-14T03:39:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationAsia and the Pacific Policy Studies, 2016, v. 3, n. 1, p. 101-110-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251723-
dc.description.abstract© 2016 The Authors. Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies published by Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. The growing number of actors involved in China's international activities has led to fractured authority in foreign policy decision-making. Actors vie for the attention of senior officials to promote their interests on any specific issue. As a result, decision making is often a slow process; there are multiple channels of information, and actors appeal to public opinion to support their claims. Since 2012, Xi Jinping has taken charge of all foreign policy related decision-making bodies in what appears to be an attempt to improve coordination of interest groups. A slight shift to a more personified foreign policy than during the Hu or Jiang eras has also taken place. In this paper, we describe how foreign policy decisions should be made in China according to formal rules; next, we take into account the reality of how the Chinese political system deals with China's evolving international role. We conclude by assessing the risks of fragmentation, on the one hand, and Xi's efforts to recentralise foreign policy, on the other hand.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAsia and the Pacific Policy Studies-
dc.subjectChinese foreign policy-
dc.subjectChinese foreign policy actors-
dc.subjectChinese political fragmentation-
dc.subjectChinese political system-
dc.subjectForeign policy decision-making-
dc.subjectXi Jinping administration-
dc.titleHow are Foreign Policy Decisions Made in China?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/app5.121-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85016085916-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage101-
dc.identifier.epage110-
dc.identifier.eissn2050-2680-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000372729700011-

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