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Article: Hypertriglyceridaemic-waist phenotype and risk of diabetes in people with impaired fasting glucose in primary care: a cohort study

TitleHypertriglyceridaemic-waist phenotype and risk of diabetes in people with impaired fasting glucose in primary care: a cohort study
Authors
Issue Date2018
Citation
Diabetic Medicine, 2018, v. 35 n. 5, p. 576-582 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: We aimed to determine the prospective association between baseline triglyceridaemic–waist phenotypes and diabetic mellitus incidence in individuals with impaired fasting glucose seen in primary care. Methods: A cohort of 1101 participants (84.4% of the recruited individuals) with impaired fasting glucose were recruited from three primary care clinics during regular follow-ups to monitor their chronic conditions. Baseline triglyceridaemic–waist phenotypes were divided into four groups: (1) normal waistline and triglyceride level (n = 252); (2) isolated central obesity (n = 518); (3) isolated high triglyceride level (n = 80); and (4) central obesity with high triglyceride level (i.e. hypertriglyceridaemic–waist phenotype) (n = 251). The presence of diabetes at follow-up was determined by fasting plasma glucose (≥ 7.0 mmol/l) and/or 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (≥ 11.1 mmol/l) and/or HbA1c (47.5 mmol/mol; ≥ 6.5%) according to American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regressions were established to assess the impact of different triglyceridaemic–waist phenotypes on time to diabetes onset. Results: After a mean follow-up period of 6.5 months (sd 4.7 months), the number of diabetes cases was significantly higher in the group with hypertriglyceridaemic–waist phenotype (52.2%) compared with the other three phenotype groups (group 1: 28.2%; group 2: 34.6%; group 3: 30.0%). Only the hypertriglyceridaemic–waist phenotype showed an increased risk of developing diabetes (hazard ratio 1.581, 95% CI 1.172–2.134; P = 0.003) compared with the group with normal waistline and triglyceride level after controlling for confounders. Conclusion: The combination of central obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia is associated with > 50% risk of progression to diabetes within 6 months among individuals with impaired fasting glucose seen in primary care.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251441
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYu, YTE-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKH-
dc.contributor.authorSit, RWS-
dc.contributor.authorWang, JHL-
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLK-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-01T03:39:21Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-01T03:39:21Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationDiabetic Medicine, 2018, v. 35 n. 5, p. 576-582-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251441-
dc.description.abstractAim: We aimed to determine the prospective association between baseline triglyceridaemic–waist phenotypes and diabetic mellitus incidence in individuals with impaired fasting glucose seen in primary care. Methods: A cohort of 1101 participants (84.4% of the recruited individuals) with impaired fasting glucose were recruited from three primary care clinics during regular follow-ups to monitor their chronic conditions. Baseline triglyceridaemic–waist phenotypes were divided into four groups: (1) normal waistline and triglyceride level (n = 252); (2) isolated central obesity (n = 518); (3) isolated high triglyceride level (n = 80); and (4) central obesity with high triglyceride level (i.e. hypertriglyceridaemic–waist phenotype) (n = 251). The presence of diabetes at follow-up was determined by fasting plasma glucose (≥ 7.0 mmol/l) and/or 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (≥ 11.1 mmol/l) and/or HbA1c (47.5 mmol/mol; ≥ 6.5%) according to American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regressions were established to assess the impact of different triglyceridaemic–waist phenotypes on time to diabetes onset. Results: After a mean follow-up period of 6.5 months (sd 4.7 months), the number of diabetes cases was significantly higher in the group with hypertriglyceridaemic–waist phenotype (52.2%) compared with the other three phenotype groups (group 1: 28.2%; group 2: 34.6%; group 3: 30.0%). Only the hypertriglyceridaemic–waist phenotype showed an increased risk of developing diabetes (hazard ratio 1.581, 95% CI 1.172–2.134; P = 0.003) compared with the group with normal waistline and triglyceride level after controlling for confounders. Conclusion: The combination of central obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia is associated with > 50% risk of progression to diabetes within 6 months among individuals with impaired fasting glucose seen in primary care.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetic Medicine-
dc.rightsPostprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [Diabetic Medicine, 2018, v. 35 n. 5, p. 576-582], which has been published in final form at [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.13601]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.titleHypertriglyceridaemic-waist phenotype and risk of diabetes in people with impaired fasting glucose in primary care: a cohort study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGuo, Y: viviguo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYu, YTE: ytyu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CKH: carlosho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYu, YTE=rp01693-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CKH=rp01931-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/dme.13601-
dc.identifier.hkuros284358-
dc.identifier.volume35-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage576-
dc.identifier.epage582-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000430118900006-

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