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Article: Help-seeking behaviours for psychological distress amongst Chinese patients

TitleHelp-seeking behaviours for psychological distress amongst Chinese patients
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2017, v. 12 n. 10, article no. e0185831 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The stepped care model for psychological distress has been promoted in recent years, leading to the enhancing roles of primary care professionals and alternative sources of help. However, most of the research findings come from Western countries. This study investigates help-seeking behaviours of Chinese patients among different types of professional and alternative sources for psychological distress in Hong Kong. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted with 1626 adult primary care attenders from 13 private and 6 public clinics, 650 (40.0%) reported that they had ever experienced psychological distress. Their help-seeking behaviours, demographic background and current distress level (measured by GHQ-12) were analysed. Results: Among the respondents with experience of psychological distress, 48.2% had sought help from professional and/or alternative sources for their distress [10.2% from professionals only, 12.6% from alternative sources only, and 25.4% from both]. Those who had sought help from professionals only were more likely to be less educated and with lower income. In contrast, those using alternative sources only were more likely to be younger, better educated, and have higher income. Allowing multiple responses, psychiatrists (22.3%) was reported to be the most popular professional source, followed by primary care physicians (17.5%), clinical psychologists (12.8%) and social workers/counsellors (12.0%). Family members/friends (28.6%) was the top alternative source, followed by exercise/sports (21.8%), religious/spiritual support (16.9%) and self-help websites/books/pamphlets (8.9%). Conclusion: While psychiatrists remain the most popular professional source of help to the Chinese patients in Hong Kong, primary care professionals and alternative sources also play significant roles. Distressed patients who are younger, better educated and have higher income are more likely to use alternative sources only. The outcomes need further research. © 2017 Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/250006
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.766
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, KS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KF-
dc.contributor.authorPiterman, L-
dc.contributor.authorLo, TL-
dc.contributor.authorChao, DVK-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WW-
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-20T09:19:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-20T09:19:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2017, v. 12 n. 10, article no. e0185831-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/250006-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The stepped care model for psychological distress has been promoted in recent years, leading to the enhancing roles of primary care professionals and alternative sources of help. However, most of the research findings come from Western countries. This study investigates help-seeking behaviours of Chinese patients among different types of professional and alternative sources for psychological distress in Hong Kong. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted with 1626 adult primary care attenders from 13 private and 6 public clinics, 650 (40.0%) reported that they had ever experienced psychological distress. Their help-seeking behaviours, demographic background and current distress level (measured by GHQ-12) were analysed. Results: Among the respondents with experience of psychological distress, 48.2% had sought help from professional and/or alternative sources for their distress [10.2% from professionals only, 12.6% from alternative sources only, and 25.4% from both]. Those who had sought help from professionals only were more likely to be less educated and with lower income. In contrast, those using alternative sources only were more likely to be younger, better educated, and have higher income. Allowing multiple responses, psychiatrists (22.3%) was reported to be the most popular professional source, followed by primary care physicians (17.5%), clinical psychologists (12.8%) and social workers/counsellors (12.0%). Family members/friends (28.6%) was the top alternative source, followed by exercise/sports (21.8%), religious/spiritual support (16.9%) and self-help websites/books/pamphlets (8.9%). Conclusion: While psychiatrists remain the most popular professional source of help to the Chinese patients in Hong Kong, primary care professionals and alternative sources also play significant roles. Distressed patients who are younger, better educated and have higher income are more likely to use alternative sources only. The outcomes need further research. © 2017 Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleHelp-seeking behaviours for psychological distress amongst Chinese patients-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSun, KS: kssun2@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TP: tplam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KF: hrntlkf@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, TL: lotl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChao, DVK: dchku001@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WW: wwlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TP=rp00386-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KF=rp00718-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0185831-
dc.identifier.pmid28968453-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85030217664-
dc.identifier.hkuros283745-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e0185831-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e0185831-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000412029600055-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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