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Conference Paper: What good is self-compassion in cancer coping? A cross-sectional study of bi-psychosocial-spiritual well-being of people with cancer

TitleWhat good is self-compassion in cancer coping? A cross-sectional study of bi-psychosocial-spiritual well-being of people with cancer
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 18th World Congress of Psycho Oncology Society (IPOS 2018), Dublin, Ireland, 17-21 October 2016. In Psycho‐Oncology, 2016, v. 25 n. Suppl. 1, p. 134, abstract no. 391 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Self‐compassion is the awareness and acceptance of suffering, and to respond to it with self‐directed kindness. It was found to be associated with better adjustment to hypothetical stressors among healthy population. Nevertheless, little is known of its clinical value among people diagnosed of life‐threatening illness. This study attempted to explore the associations between self‐compassion and body‐mind‐spiritual well‐being among people with cancer. Methods: This cross‐sectional study utilized the baseline data from a randomized‐controlled study. A total of 55 Chinese with cancer, who have completed their primary treatment, were interviewed on a self‐report questionnaire packet on self‐compassion, facets of mindfulness, positive and negative effect, depressive and anxiety symptoms, cancer‐related symptoms, and quality of sleep. Results: Self‐compassionate individuals were less likely to be self‐judgmental, to feel isolated, and get carried away by their own emotions; they were more likely to have a higher level of awareness of their inner experience and the ability to respond to them in a non‐reacting manner. In terms of psycho‐social well‐being, self‐compassionate individuals reported more positive affect and better quality of sleep; they reported fewer negative effect, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, they reported fewer cancer‐related psychological and physical symptoms, and lower level of distress. Conclusions: Self‐compassion is associated with bio‐psycho‐social‐spiritual well‐being. Results of the cross‐sectional study pointed toward the potential contributions of self‐compassion in improving affect, protecting against mood disturbance, improving quality of sleep, and reducing cancer‐related symptoms. Further study may explore the predictive validity of self‐compassion and ways to boost self‐compassion to facilitate better coping.
DescriptionOrganized by : International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248889
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.455
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWan, HYA-
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTH-
dc.contributor.authorHon, T-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:50:05Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:50:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 18th World Congress of Psycho Oncology Society (IPOS 2018), Dublin, Ireland, 17-21 October 2016. In Psycho‐Oncology, 2016, v. 25 n. Suppl. 1, p. 134, abstract no. 391-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248889-
dc.descriptionOrganized by : International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS)-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Self‐compassion is the awareness and acceptance of suffering, and to respond to it with self‐directed kindness. It was found to be associated with better adjustment to hypothetical stressors among healthy population. Nevertheless, little is known of its clinical value among people diagnosed of life‐threatening illness. This study attempted to explore the associations between self‐compassion and body‐mind‐spiritual well‐being among people with cancer. Methods: This cross‐sectional study utilized the baseline data from a randomized‐controlled study. A total of 55 Chinese with cancer, who have completed their primary treatment, were interviewed on a self‐report questionnaire packet on self‐compassion, facets of mindfulness, positive and negative effect, depressive and anxiety symptoms, cancer‐related symptoms, and quality of sleep. Results: Self‐compassionate individuals were less likely to be self‐judgmental, to feel isolated, and get carried away by their own emotions; they were more likely to have a higher level of awareness of their inner experience and the ability to respond to them in a non‐reacting manner. In terms of psycho‐social well‐being, self‐compassionate individuals reported more positive affect and better quality of sleep; they reported fewer negative effect, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, they reported fewer cancer‐related psychological and physical symptoms, and lower level of distress. Conclusions: Self‐compassion is associated with bio‐psycho‐social‐spiritual well‐being. Results of the cross‐sectional study pointed toward the potential contributions of self‐compassion in improving affect, protecting against mood disturbance, improving quality of sleep, and reducing cancer‐related symptoms. Further study may explore the predictive validity of self‐compassion and ways to boost self‐compassion to facilitate better coping.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.relation.ispartofThe 18th World Congress of Psycho Oncology Society (IPOS 2018)-
dc.titleWhat good is self-compassion in cancer coping? A cross-sectional study of bi-psychosocial-spiritual well-being of people with cancer-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailWan, HYA: awan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHon, T: cyhon@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497-
dc.identifier.hkuros281964-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage134, abstract no. 391-
dc.identifier.epage134, abstract no. 391-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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