File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Chinese medical students' knowledge, attitude and practice towards human papillomavirus vaccination and their intention to recommend the vaccine.

TitleChinese medical students' knowledge, attitude and practice towards human papillomavirus vaccination and their intention to recommend the vaccine.
Authors
Keywordshuman papillomavirus vaccine
international child health
medical education
Issue Date2018
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1440-1754
Citation
Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2018, v. 54 n. 3, p. 302-310 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective in preventing cervical cancer, but its global uptake rate in vulnerable populations is unsatisfactory. Physician's recommendation is an important determinant for vaccine uptake, but we have limited understanding on the contributing factors of physician's recommendation. This study investigated whether the knowledge, attitudes and vaccination status of medical students would affect their intention to recommend HPV vaccination. Methods: This is a population-representative survey of medical schools in Hong Kong. Results: Participants included 1022 Chinese medical students (46.9% of all in Hong Kong; 46.3% female). Better HPV-related knowledge and a more positive attitude towards HPV vaccination were important factors predicting vaccine uptake and intention to recommend. HPV vaccination status and intention to receive the vaccine were positively associated with intention to recommend among females. Conclusion: Better HPV-related medical education may be a feasible way to promote the HPV vaccine in regions without universal coverage. Medical students who have not received the HPV vaccine should also be encouraged to receive the vaccine. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248499
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.449
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.692
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, APY-
dc.contributor.authorHo, KW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, LK-
dc.contributor.authorNg, JY-
dc.contributor.authorLee, SL-
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCF-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, TF-
dc.contributor.authorIp, P-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:44:10Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:44:10Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2018, v. 54 n. 3, p. 302-310-
dc.identifier.issn1034-4810-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248499-
dc.description.abstractAim: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective in preventing cervical cancer, but its global uptake rate in vulnerable populations is unsatisfactory. Physician's recommendation is an important determinant for vaccine uptake, but we have limited understanding on the contributing factors of physician's recommendation. This study investigated whether the knowledge, attitudes and vaccination status of medical students would affect their intention to recommend HPV vaccination. Methods: This is a population-representative survey of medical schools in Hong Kong. Results: Participants included 1022 Chinese medical students (46.9% of all in Hong Kong; 46.3% female). Better HPV-related knowledge and a more positive attitude towards HPV vaccination were important factors predicting vaccine uptake and intention to recommend. HPV vaccination status and intention to receive the vaccine were positively associated with intention to recommend among females. Conclusion: Better HPV-related medical education may be a feasible way to promote the HPV vaccine in regions without universal coverage. Medical students who have not received the HPV vaccine should also be encouraged to receive the vaccine. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians)-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1440-1754-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjecthuman papillomavirus vaccine-
dc.subjectinternational child health-
dc.subjectmedical education-
dc.titleChinese medical students' knowledge, attitude and practice towards human papillomavirus vaccination and their intention to recommend the vaccine.-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, APY: apyliu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, KW: fredhkw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, SL: slleem@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCF: gcfchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, APY=rp01357-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, GCF=rp00431-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jpc.13693-
dc.identifier.pmid28876498-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85028927886-
dc.identifier.hkuros282091-
dc.identifier.volume54-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage302-
dc.identifier.epage310-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000426644100015-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats