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Conference Paper: Praying to the Blessed Mother: The Rise of Marian Sodalities in 17th-centurty China

TitlePraying to the Blessed Mother: The Rise of Marian Sodalities in 17th-centurty China
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, October 14-16, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper explores the remarkable development of organized forms of Chinese Marian devotions during the 17th-century, a period when the Roman Catholic missionary enterprise reached its peak in imperial China. By focusing on a set of key sources that have not been tended in previous research, I will examine the major prayers, liturgies, and congregational codes employed by missionaries and lay members of the church in their newly founded Marian sodalities. Instead of the parish-based model that prevailed in post-Reformation Europe, there emerged a distinct assembly-based model from the early Chinese Marian cults in Beijing, Shanghai, and other places. Moreover, though the core Catholic doctrines have been embedded in Chinese communal worship to Mary, these sodalities were organized and operated in some patterns similar to Confucian benevolent societies as well as Buddhist lay fraternities of the time. The entanglement of religiosity and secularity in these emerging Marian sodalities, often paired with a Chinese-Christian identity complex, visibly contributed to the shaping of a composite Chinese Marian culture toward the end of the 17th century.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248134

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSong, G-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:38:22Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:38:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationMidwest Conference on Asian Affairs, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, October 14-16, 2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248134-
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the remarkable development of organized forms of Chinese Marian devotions during the 17th-century, a period when the Roman Catholic missionary enterprise reached its peak in imperial China. By focusing on a set of key sources that have not been tended in previous research, I will examine the major prayers, liturgies, and congregational codes employed by missionaries and lay members of the church in their newly founded Marian sodalities. Instead of the parish-based model that prevailed in post-Reformation Europe, there emerged a distinct assembly-based model from the early Chinese Marian cults in Beijing, Shanghai, and other places. Moreover, though the core Catholic doctrines have been embedded in Chinese communal worship to Mary, these sodalities were organized and operated in some patterns similar to Confucian benevolent societies as well as Buddhist lay fraternities of the time. The entanglement of religiosity and secularity in these emerging Marian sodalities, often paired with a Chinese-Christian identity complex, visibly contributed to the shaping of a composite Chinese Marian culture toward the end of the 17th century.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofMidwest Conference on Asian Affairs, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, October 14-16, 2016-
dc.titlePraying to the Blessed Mother: The Rise of Marian Sodalities in 17th-centurty China-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailSong, G: songg@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySong, G=rp01151-
dc.identifier.hkuros281518-

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