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Article: A conceptual design of spacers with hairy structures for membrane processes

TitleA conceptual design of spacers with hairy structures for membrane processes
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/memsci
Citation
Journal of Membrane Science, 2016, v. 510, p. 314-325 How to Cite?
AbstractThe development of membrane technology requires spacers that can significantly enhance the mass-transfer rate while avoiding a severe pressure drop across the membrane module. A potential solution to this challenge is to introduce some flexible and dynamic structures into the spacer mesh. The current work was motivated to explore a conceptual design of spacers with hairy structures. The hairy structures were simulated using highly flexible nylon fibers that were fixed on a well-designed framework. The effects of fiber asymmetry and spacing on the vibrations were discussed in terms of the observations via a high speed camera. A variety of spacer prototypes were employed in a forward osmosis process to examine the performance of the hairy structures. The experimental results indicate that fiber vibrations could have a great impact on the mass transfer in the vicinity of the membrane surface and enhance the filtration flux (up to ~20%). This fundamental study not only provides insight into the mechanisms underlying the complex fiber-flow interactions but also charts the direction for future hairy spacer design.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247297
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 6.578
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.042
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, W-
dc.contributor.authorChen, KK-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorKrantz, WB-
dc.contributor.authorFane, AG-
dc.contributor.authorTang, C-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:25:11Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:25:11Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Membrane Science, 2016, v. 510, p. 314-325-
dc.identifier.issn0376-7388-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247297-
dc.description.abstractThe development of membrane technology requires spacers that can significantly enhance the mass-transfer rate while avoiding a severe pressure drop across the membrane module. A potential solution to this challenge is to introduce some flexible and dynamic structures into the spacer mesh. The current work was motivated to explore a conceptual design of spacers with hairy structures. The hairy structures were simulated using highly flexible nylon fibers that were fixed on a well-designed framework. The effects of fiber asymmetry and spacing on the vibrations were discussed in terms of the observations via a high speed camera. A variety of spacer prototypes were employed in a forward osmosis process to examine the performance of the hairy structures. The experimental results indicate that fiber vibrations could have a great impact on the mass transfer in the vicinity of the membrane surface and enhance the filtration flux (up to ~20%). This fundamental study not only provides insight into the mechanisms underlying the complex fiber-flow interactions but also charts the direction for future hairy spacer design.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/memsci-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Membrane Science-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleA conceptual design of spacers with hairy structures for membrane processes-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTang, C: tangc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, C=rp01765-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.memsci.2016.03.021-
dc.identifier.hkuros281270-
dc.identifier.volume510-
dc.identifier.spage314-
dc.identifier.epage325-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000375127300032-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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