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Conference Paper: Bedtime Variability And Altered Effort Discounting Among College Students.

TitleBedtime Variability And Altered Effort Discounting Among College Students.
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
Citation
31st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (SLEEP 2017), Boston, MA, USA, 3-7 June 2017. In Sleep, 2017, v. 40 n. Suppl. 1, p. A257 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Sleep variability (intra-individual variability in bedtime and sleep duration) is prevalent among college students. The current study aims to investigate the associations between sleep variability and decision making behaviors. Methods: Sixty-six college students (16 males, age = 17–23 y) participated in the present study, which included the actigraphic sleep assessment (Actiwatch Pro, Philips Respironics, Inc.) for eight consecutive days, followed by the completion of computerized tasks in the laboratory. Sleep parameters derived from the actigraphy included the means and standard deviations (SD) of sleep onset time, sleep offset time, nocturnal sleep duration and wake-after sleep-onset. Sleep variability was represented by SD. Impulsive decision-making behaviors were measured by the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the reward discounting task. Temporal discount (i.e., preference to smaller immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards) and effort discount (i.e., preference to typing less letters for smaller rewards over typing more letters for larger rewards) were reflected by the area under the curve (AUC), in which smaller AUCs suggesting more impatient choice pattern. Linear regression analyses were applied to examine the relationships between decision-making (dependent variables) and sleep variability (independent variables), in which gender, mental health, average sleep onset time and nocturnal sleep duration were included as covariates. Results: The average sleep onset time was 01:13 ± 1:17am, and the SD of sleep onset time was 1.17 ± 0.65 h. The average night sleep duration was 6.87 ± 0.95 h, and the SD of night sleep duration was 1.56 ± 0.66 h. Higher degree of variability in sleep onset time (as reflected by larger SD) was related with lower AUC in the effort discounting task, indicating a higher discount rate (ß = - 0.52, p < 0.001). However, no significant association was found between the performance in BART or temporal discounting of monetary rewards, and the variability in sleep parameters. Conclusion: Bedtime variability showed differential associations with discounting behaviors, which were similarly observed in individuals with sleep deprivation. In addition to sleep duration, the regularity of sleep-wake schedule may interfere with individual’s decision making especially when efforts are required.
DescriptionB. Clinical Sleep Science - Section: IV. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: abstract no. 0694
The Meeting was organized by Sleep Research Society and American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245765
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, W-
dc.contributor.authorLing, J-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC-
dc.contributor.authorLi, XS-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T02:16:28Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T02:16:28Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citation31st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (SLEEP 2017), Boston, MA, USA, 3-7 June 2017. In Sleep, 2017, v. 40 n. Suppl. 1, p. A257-
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245765-
dc.descriptionB. Clinical Sleep Science - Section: IV. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: abstract no. 0694-
dc.descriptionThe Meeting was organized by Sleep Research Society and American Academy of Sleep Medicine-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Sleep variability (intra-individual variability in bedtime and sleep duration) is prevalent among college students. The current study aims to investigate the associations between sleep variability and decision making behaviors. Methods: Sixty-six college students (16 males, age = 17–23 y) participated in the present study, which included the actigraphic sleep assessment (Actiwatch Pro, Philips Respironics, Inc.) for eight consecutive days, followed by the completion of computerized tasks in the laboratory. Sleep parameters derived from the actigraphy included the means and standard deviations (SD) of sleep onset time, sleep offset time, nocturnal sleep duration and wake-after sleep-onset. Sleep variability was represented by SD. Impulsive decision-making behaviors were measured by the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and the reward discounting task. Temporal discount (i.e., preference to smaller immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards) and effort discount (i.e., preference to typing less letters for smaller rewards over typing more letters for larger rewards) were reflected by the area under the curve (AUC), in which smaller AUCs suggesting more impatient choice pattern. Linear regression analyses were applied to examine the relationships between decision-making (dependent variables) and sleep variability (independent variables), in which gender, mental health, average sleep onset time and nocturnal sleep duration were included as covariates. Results: The average sleep onset time was 01:13 ± 1:17am, and the SD of sleep onset time was 1.17 ± 0.65 h. The average night sleep duration was 6.87 ± 0.95 h, and the SD of night sleep duration was 1.56 ± 0.66 h. Higher degree of variability in sleep onset time (as reflected by larger SD) was related with lower AUC in the effort discounting task, indicating a higher discount rate (ß = - 0.52, p < 0.001). However, no significant association was found between the performance in BART or temporal discounting of monetary rewards, and the variability in sleep parameters. Conclusion: Bedtime variability showed differential associations with discounting behaviors, which were similarly observed in individuals with sleep deprivation. In addition to sleep duration, the regularity of sleep-wake schedule may interfere with individual’s decision making especially when efforts are required.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep-
dc.titleBedtime Variability And Altered Effort Discounting Among College Students.-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, XS: shirleyx@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XS=rp02114-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/sleepj/zsx050.693-
dc.identifier.hkuros278454-
dc.identifier.volume40-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageA257-
dc.identifier.epageA257-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000433175000693-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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