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Conference Paper: Perceived information trustworthiness and parents' risk perceptions regarding childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Hong Kong

TitlePerceived information trustworthiness and parents' risk perceptions regarding childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529
Citation
14th International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: Behavioral Medicine: Making an Impact in the Modern World, Melbourne, Australia, 7-10 December 2016. In International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, v. 23 n. Suppl. 1, p. S103, abstract no. P315 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: With the increasing access to a spectrum of information regarding influenza vaccination from various sources, parents’ trust in information from these sources is crucial for their decision-making on children’s influenza vaccination. This study examined how perceived trustworthiness of information from different sources was associated with parental risk perceptions regarding childhood seasonal influenza vaccination. Methods: 1,389 parents of young children (aged 6 months-6 years) completed a randomly dialled telephone interview based on a standardized questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) extracted factors underlying information trust while logistic regression models enabled examining how perceived information trustworthiness was associated with risk perceptions of childhood influenza and influenza vaccination. Results: Two factors related to information trust were extracted: trust in formal sources (government-agency sources) (Cronbach’s α=0.79) and trust in peers (α=0.76). Parents with an educational level of ≥tertiary had more trust in formal information sources (OR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.02-1.68) but less trust in peers (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.63-0.97). Parents aged ≥45 years were less likely to trust peers (OR=0.57, 95%CI: 0.41-0.78). After adjustment for parental demographics, trust in formal information sources was positively associated with perceived child susceptibility to influenza (OR=1.33, 95%CI: 1.01-1.74), perceived benefit (OR=1.61, 95%CI: 1.24-2.08) and safety (OR=1.65, 95%CI: 1.25-2.17) of influenza vaccination for children, while more trust in peers was associated with feeling more anxious about the child being infected with influenza (OR=1.40, 95%CI: 1.11-1.76). Conclusions: Information from formal sources appears associated with cognitive risk evaluation while that from peers is more associated with affective risk response.
DescriptionPoster presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244617
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Q-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT-
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T01:55:53Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T01:55:53Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citation14th International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: Behavioral Medicine: Making an Impact in the Modern World, Melbourne, Australia, 7-10 December 2016. In International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, v. 23 n. Suppl. 1, p. S103, abstract no. P315-
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244617-
dc.descriptionPoster presentation-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: With the increasing access to a spectrum of information regarding influenza vaccination from various sources, parents’ trust in information from these sources is crucial for their decision-making on children’s influenza vaccination. This study examined how perceived trustworthiness of information from different sources was associated with parental risk perceptions regarding childhood seasonal influenza vaccination. Methods: 1,389 parents of young children (aged 6 months-6 years) completed a randomly dialled telephone interview based on a standardized questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) extracted factors underlying information trust while logistic regression models enabled examining how perceived information trustworthiness was associated with risk perceptions of childhood influenza and influenza vaccination. Results: Two factors related to information trust were extracted: trust in formal sources (government-agency sources) (Cronbach’s α=0.79) and trust in peers (α=0.76). Parents with an educational level of ≥tertiary had more trust in formal information sources (OR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.02-1.68) but less trust in peers (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.63-0.97). Parents aged ≥45 years were less likely to trust peers (OR=0.57, 95%CI: 0.41-0.78). After adjustment for parental demographics, trust in formal information sources was positively associated with perceived child susceptibility to influenza (OR=1.33, 95%CI: 1.01-1.74), perceived benefit (OR=1.61, 95%CI: 1.24-2.08) and safety (OR=1.65, 95%CI: 1.25-2.17) of influenza vaccination for children, while more trust in peers was associated with feeling more anxious about the child being infected with influenza (OR=1.40, 95%CI: 1.11-1.76). Conclusions: Information from formal sources appears associated with cognitive risk evaluation while that from peers is more associated with affective risk response.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12529-016-9586-3-
dc.titlePerceived information trustworthiness and parents' risk perceptions regarding childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Hong Kong-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLiao, Q: qyliao11@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLiao, Q=rp02100-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443-
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339-
dc.identifier.hkuros277620-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS103, abstract no. P315-
dc.identifier.epageS103, abstract no. P315-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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