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Conference Paper: Change in Patient-Reported Outcomes in Single-Unit Transfusion Comparable with Double-Unit Transfusion

TitleChange in Patient-Reported Outcomes in Single-Unit Transfusion Comparable with Double-Unit Transfusion
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherAmerican Society of Hematology. The Journal's web site is located at http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/
Citation
58th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American-Society-of-Hematology, San Diego, CA, 03-06 December 2016. In Blood, 2016, v. 128 n. 22, p. abstract no. 2636 How to Cite?
AbstractThis was a single-center prospective study conducted during Mar to Jun 2016 in the medical department of a regional hospital of Hong Kong. Day-care and hospitalized patients requiring RBC transfusion were recruited. Patients with active bleeding or unstable hemodynamics were excluded. Subjects' demographics, recent transfusion history, comorbidities, transfusion trigger and the number of RBC units transfused were obtained. Patient-reported outcomes were measured on the day of transfusion (Day 0), and on Day 1 and 7 post-transfusion. Two health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments, i.e. Short-form 12 version 2 (SF12v2) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Anemia Subscale (FACT-AnS) in traditional Chinese, were administered to measure the general health status and anemic symptoms respectively. Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were then derived from SF12v2. The number of RBC units transfused in one week and post-transfusion hemoglobin (Hb) level were evaluated. Linear regressions were performed to study the relationship between the changes in PCS, MCS and FACT-AnS on Day 1 and Day 7 from Day 0 with the number of RBC units transfused. Factors associated with the number of RBC units transfused were controlled. Other predictors of the changes in HRQOL were included in the regression analysis. 34 day-care and 67 hospitalized patients were recruited with HRQOL surveys completed on Day 0. The surveys were completed by 97 patients on Day 1 and 78 patients on Day 7. Forty-seven patients (47%), who were transfused with 2 or more units of RBC, were classified as double-unit group. The median transfusion trigger was 7.6 [IQR 7.0 - 7.9] g/dL in the single-unit group and 7.0 [IQR 6.2 - 7.8] g/dL in the double-unit group (p < 0.05). There was a trend of higher Charlson's Comorbidity Index (CCI) (p = 0.09) in the single-unit group. Baseline PCS, MCS and FACT-AnS scores on Day 0 were comparable in both groups (p = 0.35, 0.45 and 0.15 respectively).The changes in HRQOL of all subjects were summarized in Table 1. FACIT-AnS improved after transfusion but the effect size was small (Cohen's d < 0.5). There was improvement of PCS on Day 7. The change of MCS was non-significant. The mean number of transfused RBC in one week was 0.7 units less in the single-unit group (p < 0.001). The post-transfusion Hb level was 0.9g/dL (95% CI: 0.3, 1.6) and 1.1g/dL (95% CI: 0.2, 1.9) higher in the double-unit group on Day 1 and Day 7 respectively. Having controlled for transfusion trigger, CCI and RBC transfused during Day 1 to Day 7, the changes in HRQOL were not associated with the number of RBC units transfused (Table 2). Day-care patients had greater improvement in HRQOL on Day 1 but not on Day 7. The improvement of HRQOL in those having worse baseline scores was more significant. RBC use in the past 7 days was not associated with the change in patient-reported outcomes. Double-unit RBC transfusion was frequently performed, especially in patients with a lower Hb level. Blood transfusion could improve anemic symptoms but the effect on general health status was insignificant during early follow-up. The average number of RBC units transfused in one week was 28% less in the single-unit group. Post-transfusion Hb level was higher after double-unit transfusion, but there was no evidence it led to more significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes. Day-care patients had earlier improvement in HRQOL but the effect disappeared after one week. Patients with worse symptom score at baseline had greater improvement in HRQOL. It is proposed that the practice of single-unit RBC transfusion is appropriate in terms of alleviating anemic symptoms and reducing overall blood use. [Abstact from author]
DescriptionMeeting abstract
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244558
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 15.132
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KL-
dc.contributor.authorMak, WM-
dc.contributor.authorTam, YH-
dc.contributor.authorLee, KK-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T01:54:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T01:54:41Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citation58th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American-Society-of-Hematology, San Diego, CA, 03-06 December 2016. In Blood, 2016, v. 128 n. 22, p. abstract no. 2636-
dc.identifier.issn0006-4971-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244558-
dc.descriptionMeeting abstract-
dc.description.abstractThis was a single-center prospective study conducted during Mar to Jun 2016 in the medical department of a regional hospital of Hong Kong. Day-care and hospitalized patients requiring RBC transfusion were recruited. Patients with active bleeding or unstable hemodynamics were excluded. Subjects' demographics, recent transfusion history, comorbidities, transfusion trigger and the number of RBC units transfused were obtained. Patient-reported outcomes were measured on the day of transfusion (Day 0), and on Day 1 and 7 post-transfusion. Two health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments, i.e. Short-form 12 version 2 (SF12v2) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Anemia Subscale (FACT-AnS) in traditional Chinese, were administered to measure the general health status and anemic symptoms respectively. Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were then derived from SF12v2. The number of RBC units transfused in one week and post-transfusion hemoglobin (Hb) level were evaluated. Linear regressions were performed to study the relationship between the changes in PCS, MCS and FACT-AnS on Day 1 and Day 7 from Day 0 with the number of RBC units transfused. Factors associated with the number of RBC units transfused were controlled. Other predictors of the changes in HRQOL were included in the regression analysis. 34 day-care and 67 hospitalized patients were recruited with HRQOL surveys completed on Day 0. The surveys were completed by 97 patients on Day 1 and 78 patients on Day 7. Forty-seven patients (47%), who were transfused with 2 or more units of RBC, were classified as double-unit group. The median transfusion trigger was 7.6 [IQR 7.0 - 7.9] g/dL in the single-unit group and 7.0 [IQR 6.2 - 7.8] g/dL in the double-unit group (p < 0.05). There was a trend of higher Charlson's Comorbidity Index (CCI) (p = 0.09) in the single-unit group. Baseline PCS, MCS and FACT-AnS scores on Day 0 were comparable in both groups (p = 0.35, 0.45 and 0.15 respectively).The changes in HRQOL of all subjects were summarized in Table 1. FACIT-AnS improved after transfusion but the effect size was small (Cohen's d < 0.5). There was improvement of PCS on Day 7. The change of MCS was non-significant. The mean number of transfused RBC in one week was 0.7 units less in the single-unit group (p < 0.001). The post-transfusion Hb level was 0.9g/dL (95% CI: 0.3, 1.6) and 1.1g/dL (95% CI: 0.2, 1.9) higher in the double-unit group on Day 1 and Day 7 respectively. Having controlled for transfusion trigger, CCI and RBC transfused during Day 1 to Day 7, the changes in HRQOL were not associated with the number of RBC units transfused (Table 2). Day-care patients had greater improvement in HRQOL on Day 1 but not on Day 7. The improvement of HRQOL in those having worse baseline scores was more significant. RBC use in the past 7 days was not associated with the change in patient-reported outcomes. Double-unit RBC transfusion was frequently performed, especially in patients with a lower Hb level. Blood transfusion could improve anemic symptoms but the effect on general health status was insignificant during early follow-up. The average number of RBC units transfused in one week was 28% less in the single-unit group. Post-transfusion Hb level was higher after double-unit transfusion, but there was no evidence it led to more significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes. Day-care patients had earlier improvement in HRQOL but the effect disappeared after one week. Patients with worse symptom score at baseline had greater improvement in HRQOL. It is proposed that the practice of single-unit RBC transfusion is appropriate in terms of alleviating anemic symptoms and reducing overall blood use. [Abstact from author]-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Hematology. The Journal's web site is located at http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofBlood-
dc.rightsThis research was originally published in The Hematologist: ASH News and Reports. Author(s). Title. The Hematologist: ASH News and Reports. Year;Vol,Issue:pp-pp. © the American Society of Hematology.-
dc.titleChange in Patient-Reported Outcomes in Single-Unit Transfusion Comparable with Double-Unit Transfusion-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailTam, YH: yhtam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTam, YH=rp01881-
dc.identifier.hkuros277223-
dc.identifier.volume128-
dc.identifier.issue22-
dc.identifier.spageabstract no. 2636-
dc.identifier.epageabstract no. 2636-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000394452302056-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.other58th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American-Society-of-Hematology, San Diego, CA, 03-06 December 2016. In Blood, 2016, v. 128 n. 22, p. abstract no. 2636-

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