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Article: Relationship between Chinese medicine dietary patterns and the incidence of breast cancer in Chinese women in Hong Kong: a retrospective cross-sectional survey

TitleRelationship between Chinese medicine dietary patterns and the incidence of breast cancer in Chinese women in Hong Kong: a retrospective cross-sectional survey
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmjournal.org/home
Citation
Chinese Medicine, 2017, v. 12, p. 17:1-17:10 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between Chinese medicine (CM) dietary patterns (hot, neutral, and cold) and the incidence of breast cancer among Chinese women in Hong Kong. Methods Breast cancer cases (n = 202) and healthy controls (n = 202) were matched according to demographics. Chinese women residing in Hong Kong for the past 7 years were recruited by media advertisements (e.g., via newspapers, radio, and posters). The control participants were recruited by convenience sampling from health workshops held in clinics and communities of 15 districts of Hong Kong. After completing test–retest reliability, all participants were asked to complete diet pattern questionnaires about their food preferences and dietary patterns. The Student’s unpaired t test, Chi square test, and logistic regression were conducted using SPSS software. Results Three major CM dietary patterns were identified: hot, neutral, and cold. The participants with breast cancer exhibited a stronger preference for hot food than the control group (Chi square test, P < 0.001). A higher frequency of breast cancer was associated with a higher frequency of dining out for breakfast (4–5 times per week, Chi square test, P = 0.015; 6–7 times per week, Chi square test, P < 0.001) and lunch (4–5 times per week, Chi square test, P < 0.001; 6–7 times per week, Chi square test, P = 0.006). The participants with no history of breast cancer consumed CM supplements and Guangdong soups (1–2 times per week, Chi square test, P = 0.05; >3 times per week, Chi square test, P < 0.001) more frequently than those with breast cancer. Conclusions Non-breast cancer participants adopted a neutral (healthy and balanced) dietary pattern, and consumed CM supplements and Guangdong soups more frequently. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13020-017-0138-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243611
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.802
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.655
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZheng, X-
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-
dc.contributor.authorXie, T-
dc.contributor.authorXia, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLoo, TY-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-25T02:57:14Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-25T02:57:14Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationChinese Medicine, 2017, v. 12, p. 17:1-17:10-
dc.identifier.issn1749-8546-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243611-
dc.description.abstractBackground This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between Chinese medicine (CM) dietary patterns (hot, neutral, and cold) and the incidence of breast cancer among Chinese women in Hong Kong. Methods Breast cancer cases (n = 202) and healthy controls (n = 202) were matched according to demographics. Chinese women residing in Hong Kong for the past 7 years were recruited by media advertisements (e.g., via newspapers, radio, and posters). The control participants were recruited by convenience sampling from health workshops held in clinics and communities of 15 districts of Hong Kong. After completing test–retest reliability, all participants were asked to complete diet pattern questionnaires about their food preferences and dietary patterns. The Student’s unpaired t test, Chi square test, and logistic regression were conducted using SPSS software. Results Three major CM dietary patterns were identified: hot, neutral, and cold. The participants with breast cancer exhibited a stronger preference for hot food than the control group (Chi square test, P < 0.001). A higher frequency of breast cancer was associated with a higher frequency of dining out for breakfast (4–5 times per week, Chi square test, P = 0.015; 6–7 times per week, Chi square test, P < 0.001) and lunch (4–5 times per week, Chi square test, P < 0.001; 6–7 times per week, Chi square test, P = 0.006). The participants with no history of breast cancer consumed CM supplements and Guangdong soups (1–2 times per week, Chi square test, P = 0.05; >3 times per week, Chi square test, P < 0.001) more frequently than those with breast cancer. Conclusions Non-breast cancer participants adopted a neutral (healthy and balanced) dietary pattern, and consumed CM supplements and Guangdong soups more frequently. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13020-017-0138-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmjournal.org/home-
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Medicine-
dc.rightsChinese Medicine. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleRelationship between Chinese medicine dietary patterns and the incidence of breast cancer in Chinese women in Hong Kong: a retrospective cross-sectional survey-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, J: abchen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLoo, TY: tyloo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, J=rp01316-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13020-017-0138-9-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5492296-
dc.identifier.hkuros275218-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.spage17:1-
dc.identifier.epage17:10-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000404507400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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