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Conference Paper: Optical time-stretch microscopy enabled by free-space angular-chirp-enhanced delay

TitleOptical time-stretch microscopy enabled by free-space angular-chirp-enhanced delay
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherSPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering. The Journal's web site is located at http://spie.org/x1848.xml?WT.svl=mddp2
Citation
SPIE BiOS: High-Speed Biomedical Imaging and Spectroscopy: Toward Big Data Instrumentation and Management II, San Francisco, California, USA, 28 January - 2 February 2017. In Proceedings of SPIE, 2017, v. 10076, article no. 1007611 How to Cite?
AbstractOptical time-stretch microscopy enables cellular images captured at tens of MHz line-scan rate and becomes a potential tool for ultrafast dynamics monitoring and high throughput screening in scientific and biomedical applications. In time-stretch microscopy, to achieve the fast line-scan rate, optical fibers are used as the pulse-stretching device that maps the spectrum of a light pulse to a temporal waveform for fast digitization. Consequently, existing time-stretch microscopy is limited to work at telecom windows (e.g. 1550 nm) where optical fiber has significant pulse-stretching and small loss. This limitation circumscribes the potential application of time-stretch microscopy. Here we present a new optical time-stretch imaging modality by exploiting a novel pulse-stretching technique, free-space angular-chirp-enhanced delay (FACED), which has three benefits: (1) Pulse-stretching in FACED generates substantial, reconfigurable temporal dispersion in free-space with low intrinsic loss at visible wavelengths; (2) Pulse-stretching in FACED inherently provides an ultrafast all-optical laser-beam scanning mechanism for time-stretch imaging. (3) Pulse-stretching in FACED can be wavelength-invariant, which enables time-stretch microscopy implemented without spectral-encoding. Using FACED, we demonstrate optical time-stretch microscopy with visible light (~700 nm). Compared to the prior work, bright-field time-stretch images captured show superior contrast and resolution, and can be effectively colorized to generate color time-stretch images. More prominently, accessing the visible spectrum regime, we demonstrate that FACED enables ultrafast fluorescence time-stretch microscopy. Our results suggest FACED could unleash a wider scope of applications that were once forbidden with the fiber based time-stretch imaging techniques.
DescriptionConference presentation recording
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243310
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, J-
dc.contributor.authorXu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLau, AKS-
dc.contributor.authorTang, AHL-
dc.contributor.authorChan, ACS-
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKY-
dc.contributor.authorTsia, KKM-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-25T02:53:07Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-25T02:53:07Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationSPIE BiOS: High-Speed Biomedical Imaging and Spectroscopy: Toward Big Data Instrumentation and Management II, San Francisco, California, USA, 28 January - 2 February 2017. In Proceedings of SPIE, 2017, v. 10076, article no. 1007611-
dc.identifier.issn0277-786X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243310-
dc.descriptionConference presentation recording-
dc.description.abstractOptical time-stretch microscopy enables cellular images captured at tens of MHz line-scan rate and becomes a potential tool for ultrafast dynamics monitoring and high throughput screening in scientific and biomedical applications. In time-stretch microscopy, to achieve the fast line-scan rate, optical fibers are used as the pulse-stretching device that maps the spectrum of a light pulse to a temporal waveform for fast digitization. Consequently, existing time-stretch microscopy is limited to work at telecom windows (e.g. 1550 nm) where optical fiber has significant pulse-stretching and small loss. This limitation circumscribes the potential application of time-stretch microscopy. Here we present a new optical time-stretch imaging modality by exploiting a novel pulse-stretching technique, free-space angular-chirp-enhanced delay (FACED), which has three benefits: (1) Pulse-stretching in FACED generates substantial, reconfigurable temporal dispersion in free-space with low intrinsic loss at visible wavelengths; (2) Pulse-stretching in FACED inherently provides an ultrafast all-optical laser-beam scanning mechanism for time-stretch imaging. (3) Pulse-stretching in FACED can be wavelength-invariant, which enables time-stretch microscopy implemented without spectral-encoding. Using FACED, we demonstrate optical time-stretch microscopy with visible light (~700 nm). Compared to the prior work, bright-field time-stretch images captured show superior contrast and resolution, and can be effectively colorized to generate color time-stretch images. More prominently, accessing the visible spectrum regime, we demonstrate that FACED enables ultrafast fluorescence time-stretch microscopy. Our results suggest FACED could unleash a wider scope of applications that were once forbidden with the fiber based time-stretch imaging techniques.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering. The Journal's web site is located at http://spie.org/x1848.xml?WT.svl=mddp2-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of SPIE-
dc.titleOptical time-stretch microscopy enabled by free-space angular-chirp-enhanced delay-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailWu, J: jlwu2015@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, AKS: andylks@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, KKY: kywong04@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsia, KKM: tsia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, KKY=rp00189-
dc.identifier.authorityTsia, KKM=rp01389-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.2251377-
dc.identifier.hkuros274226-
dc.identifier.volume10076-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1007611-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1007611-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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