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Article: Can cultural norms reduce conflicts? Confucianism and peasant rebellions in Qing China

TitleCan cultural norms reduce conflicts? Confucianism and peasant rebellions in Qing China
Authors
KeywordsConfucianism
Conflicts
Peasant rebellions
Economic shocks
Cultural norms
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier.
Citation
Journal of Development Economics, 2014, v. 111, p. 132-149 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014 Elsevier B.V. Can culture mitigate conflicts triggered by economic shocks? In light of the extraordinary emphasis that Confucianism places on subordination and pacifism, we examine its role in possibly attenuating peasant rebellion within the historical context of China (circa 1651-1910). Our analysis finds that, while crop failure triggers peasant rebellion, its effect is significantly smaller in counties characterized by stronger Confucian norms as proxied by Confucian temples and chaste women. This result remains robust after controlling for a long list of covariates and instrumenting Confucian norms using ancient Confucian sages (500. B.C.-A.D. 550) to address concerns of measurement error and reverse causality. 550 to instrument Confucian norms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242638
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.205
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.840
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKung, James Kai Sing-
dc.contributor.authorMa, Chicheng-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T10:51:11Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-10T10:51:11Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Development Economics, 2014, v. 111, p. 132-149-
dc.identifier.issn0304-3878-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242638-
dc.description.abstract© 2014 Elsevier B.V. Can culture mitigate conflicts triggered by economic shocks? In light of the extraordinary emphasis that Confucianism places on subordination and pacifism, we examine its role in possibly attenuating peasant rebellion within the historical context of China (circa 1651-1910). Our analysis finds that, while crop failure triggers peasant rebellion, its effect is significantly smaller in counties characterized by stronger Confucian norms as proxied by Confucian temples and chaste women. This result remains robust after controlling for a long list of covariates and instrumenting Confucian norms using ancient Confucian sages (500. B.C.-A.D. 550) to address concerns of measurement error and reverse causality. 550 to instrument Confucian norms.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Development Economics-
dc.subjectConfucianism-
dc.subjectConflicts-
dc.subjectPeasant rebellions-
dc.subjectEconomic shocks-
dc.subjectCultural norms-
dc.titleCan cultural norms reduce conflicts? Confucianism and peasant rebellions in Qing China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jdeveco.2014.08.006-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84907952391-
dc.identifier.volume111-
dc.identifier.spage132-
dc.identifier.epage149-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000346223900010-

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