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Article: Autarky and the rise and fall of piracy in Ming China

TitleAutarky and the rise and fall of piracy in Ming China
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Economic History, 2014, v. 74, n. 2, p. 509-534 How to Cite?
AbstractWe examine the impact of rigorous trade suppression during 1550-1567 on the sharp rise of piracy in this period of Ming China. By analyzing a uniquely constructed historical data set, we find that the enforcement of a sea (trade) ban policy led to a rise in pirate attacks that was 1.3 times greater among the coastal prefectures more suitable for silk manufactures-our proxy for greater trade potential. Our study illuminates the conflicts in which China subsequently engaged with the Western powers, conflicts that eventually resulted in the forced abandonment of its long upheld autarkic principle. © 2014 The Economic History Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242634
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.379
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.224
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKung, James Kai Sing-
dc.contributor.authorMa, Chicheng-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T10:51:11Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-10T10:51:11Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Economic History, 2014, v. 74, n. 2, p. 509-534-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0507-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242634-
dc.description.abstractWe examine the impact of rigorous trade suppression during 1550-1567 on the sharp rise of piracy in this period of Ming China. By analyzing a uniquely constructed historical data set, we find that the enforcement of a sea (trade) ban policy led to a rise in pirate attacks that was 1.3 times greater among the coastal prefectures more suitable for silk manufactures-our proxy for greater trade potential. Our study illuminates the conflicts in which China subsequently engaged with the Western powers, conflicts that eventually resulted in the forced abandonment of its long upheld autarkic principle. © 2014 The Economic History Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Economic History-
dc.titleAutarky and the rise and fall of piracy in Ming China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0022050714000345-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84901004536-
dc.identifier.volume74-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage509-
dc.identifier.epage534-
dc.identifier.eissn1471-6372-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000336505200007-

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