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Article: Observational learning: Evidence from a randomized natural field experiment

TitleObservational learning: Evidence from a randomized natural field experiment
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
American Economic Review, 2009, v. 99, n. 3, p. 864-882 How to Cite?
AbstractWe report results from a randomized natural field experiment conducted in a restaurant dining setting to distinguish the observational learning effect from the saliency effect. We find that, when customers are given ranking information of the five most popular dishes, the demand for those dishes increases by 13 to 20 percent. We do not find a significant saliency effect. We also find modest evidence that the observational learning effects are stronger among infrequent customers, and that dining satisfaction is increased when customers are presented with the information of the top five dishes, but not when presented with only names of some sample dishes. (JEL C93, D83).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241896
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.528
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.048
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCai, Hongbin-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yuyu-
dc.contributor.authorFang, Hanming-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T01:56:03Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-23T01:56:03Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Economic Review, 2009, v. 99, n. 3, p. 864-882-
dc.identifier.issn0002-8282-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241896-
dc.description.abstractWe report results from a randomized natural field experiment conducted in a restaurant dining setting to distinguish the observational learning effect from the saliency effect. We find that, when customers are given ranking information of the five most popular dishes, the demand for those dishes increases by 13 to 20 percent. We do not find a significant saliency effect. We also find modest evidence that the observational learning effects are stronger among infrequent customers, and that dining satisfaction is increased when customers are presented with the information of the top five dishes, but not when presented with only names of some sample dishes. (JEL C93, D83).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Economic Review-
dc.titleObservational learning: Evidence from a randomized natural field experiment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1257/aer.99.3.864-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73649135054-
dc.identifier.volume99-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage864-
dc.identifier.epage882-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267626000012-

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