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Article: Stimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners

TitleStimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners
Authors
Issue Date2017
Citation
Computers in Human Behavior, 2017, v. 75, p. 461-468 How to Cite?
AbstractNovel technology can be a powerful tool for enhancing students' interest in many learning domains. However, the sustainability and overall impact of such interest is unclear. This study tests the longer-term effects of technology on students' task and course interest. The experimental study was conducted with students in foreign language classes (n = 122): a 12-week experimental trial that included pre- and post-course interest, and a sequence of task interest measures. Employing a counterbalanced design, at three week intervals students engaged in separate speaking tasks with each of a Human and “Chatbot” partner. Students' interest in successive tasks and in the course (pre-post), were used to assess differential partner effects and course interest development trajectories. Comparisons of task interest under different partner conditions over time indicated a significant drop in students' task interest with the Chatbot but not Human partner. After accounting for initial course interest, Structural Equation Modelling indicated that only task interest with the Human partner contributed to developing course interest. While Human partner task interest predicted future course interest, task interest under Chatbot partner conditions did not. Under Chatbot partner conditions there was a drop in task interest after the first task: a novelty effect. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241841
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFryer, LK-
dc.contributor.authorAinley, M-
dc.contributor.authorThompson, A-
dc.contributor.authorGibson, A-
dc.contributor.authorZelinda, S-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T01:49:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-20T01:49:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationComputers in Human Behavior, 2017, v. 75, p. 461-468-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241841-
dc.description.abstractNovel technology can be a powerful tool for enhancing students' interest in many learning domains. However, the sustainability and overall impact of such interest is unclear. This study tests the longer-term effects of technology on students' task and course interest. The experimental study was conducted with students in foreign language classes (n = 122): a 12-week experimental trial that included pre- and post-course interest, and a sequence of task interest measures. Employing a counterbalanced design, at three week intervals students engaged in separate speaking tasks with each of a Human and “Chatbot” partner. Students' interest in successive tasks and in the course (pre-post), were used to assess differential partner effects and course interest development trajectories. Comparisons of task interest under different partner conditions over time indicated a significant drop in students' task interest with the Chatbot but not Human partner. After accounting for initial course interest, Structural Equation Modelling indicated that only task interest with the Human partner contributed to developing course interest. While Human partner task interest predicted future course interest, task interest under Chatbot partner conditions did not. Under Chatbot partner conditions there was a drop in task interest after the first task: a novelty effect. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofComputers in Human Behavior-
dc.titleStimulating and sustaining interest in a language course: An experimental comparison of Chatbot and Human task partners-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailFryer, LK: fryer@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFryer, LK=rp02148-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.045-
dc.identifier.hkuros272697-
dc.identifier.volume75-
dc.identifier.spage461-
dc.identifier.epage468-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000407186500046-

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