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Article: Meditation-induced neuroplastic changes in amygdala activity during negative affective processing

TitleMeditation-induced neuroplastic changes in amygdala activity during negative affective processing
Authors
KeywordsAmygdala
meditation training
fMRI
negative emotion
anxiety
Issue Date2017
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17470919.asp
Citation
Social Neuroscience, 2017, v. 13 n. 3, p. 277-288 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent evidence suggests that the effects of meditation practice on affective processing and resilience have the potential to induce neuroplastic changes within the amygdala. Notably, literature speculates that meditation training may reduce amygdala activity during negative affective processing. Nonetheless, studies have thus far not verified this speculation. In this longitudinal study, participants (N = 21, 9 men) were trained in awareness-based compassion meditation (ABCM) or matched relaxation training. The effects of meditation training on amygdala activity were examined during passive viewing of affective and neutral stimuli in a non-meditative state. We found that the ABCM group exhibited significantly reduced anxiety and right amygdala activity during negative emotion processing than the relaxation group. Furthermore, ABCM participants who performed more compassion practice had stronger right amygdala activity reduction during negative emotion processing. The lower right amygdala activity after ABCM training may be associated with a general reduction in reactivity and distress. As all participants performed the emotion processing task in a non-meditative state, it appears likely that the changes in right amygdala activity are carried over from the meditation practice into the non-meditative state. These findings suggest that the distress-reducing effects of meditation practice on affective processing may transfer to ordinary states, which have important implications on stress management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241543
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.575
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MK-
dc.contributor.authorLau, KWW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSY-
dc.contributor.authorFung, ALC-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T01:45:10Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-20T01:45:10Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationSocial Neuroscience, 2017, v. 13 n. 3, p. 277-288-
dc.identifier.issn1747-0919-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241543-
dc.description.abstractRecent evidence suggests that the effects of meditation practice on affective processing and resilience have the potential to induce neuroplastic changes within the amygdala. Notably, literature speculates that meditation training may reduce amygdala activity during negative affective processing. Nonetheless, studies have thus far not verified this speculation. In this longitudinal study, participants (N = 21, 9 men) were trained in awareness-based compassion meditation (ABCM) or matched relaxation training. The effects of meditation training on amygdala activity were examined during passive viewing of affective and neutral stimuli in a non-meditative state. We found that the ABCM group exhibited significantly reduced anxiety and right amygdala activity during negative emotion processing than the relaxation group. Furthermore, ABCM participants who performed more compassion practice had stronger right amygdala activity reduction during negative emotion processing. The lower right amygdala activity after ABCM training may be associated with a general reduction in reactivity and distress. As all participants performed the emotion processing task in a non-meditative state, it appears likely that the changes in right amygdala activity are carried over from the meditation practice into the non-meditative state. These findings suggest that the distress-reducing effects of meditation practice on affective processing may transfer to ordinary states, which have important implications on stress management.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17470919.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Neuroscience-
dc.rightsSocial Neuroscience. Copyright © Psychology Press.-
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectAmygdala-
dc.subjectmeditation training-
dc.subjectfMRI-
dc.subjectnegative emotion-
dc.subjectanxiety-
dc.titleMeditation-induced neuroplastic changes in amygdala activity during negative affective processing-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, MK: mklleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, KWW: wayhku@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17470919.2017.1311939-
dc.identifier.pmid28393652-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85017201255-
dc.identifier.hkuros272707-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage277-
dc.identifier.epage288-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000429358800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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