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Article: Fine particulate matter exposure and incidence of stroke: A cohort study in Hong Kong

TitleFine particulate matter exposure and incidence of stroke: A cohort study in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.neurology.org
Citation
Neurology, 2017, v. 88 n. 18, p. 1709-1717 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: We aimed to assess the association of long-term residential exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) with the incidence of stroke and its major subtypes. Methods: We ascertained the first occurrence of emergency hospital admission for stroke in a Hong Kong Chinese cohort of 66,820 older people (65+ years) who enrolled during 1998–2001 (baseline) and were followed up to December 31, 2010. High-resolution (1 × 1 km) yearly mean concentrations of PM2.5 were predicted from local monitoring data and US National Aeronautics and Space Administration satellite data using linear regression. Baseline residential PM2.5 exposure was used as a proxy for long-term exposure. We used Cox proportional hazards to evaluate the risk of incident stroke associated with PM2.5 exposure adjusted for potential confounders, including individual and neighborhood factors. Results: Over a mean follow-up of 9.4 years, we ascertained 6,733 cases of incident stroke, of which 3,526 (52.4%) were ischemic and 1,175 (17.5%) were hemorrhagic. The hazard ratio for every 10 μg/m3 higher PM2.5 concentration was statistically significant at 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.41) for ischemic and non-statistically significant at 0.90 (95% CI 0.70–1.17) for hemorrhagic stroke in fully adjusted model 3. The estimates for ischemic stroke were higher in older participants (>70 years), less educated participants, and in men for current smokers. Conclusion: Long-term PM2.5 exposure was associated with higher risk of incident ischemic stroke, but the association with incident hemorrhagic stroke was less clear.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241502
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 8.055
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.691
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, H-
dc.contributor.authorSUN, S-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, H-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CM-
dc.contributor.authorLee, RS-
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CM-
dc.contributor.authorTian, L-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T01:44:35Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-20T01:44:35Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationNeurology, 2017, v. 88 n. 18, p. 1709-1717-
dc.identifier.issn0028-3878-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241502-
dc.description.abstractObjective: We aimed to assess the association of long-term residential exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) with the incidence of stroke and its major subtypes. Methods: We ascertained the first occurrence of emergency hospital admission for stroke in a Hong Kong Chinese cohort of 66,820 older people (65+ years) who enrolled during 1998–2001 (baseline) and were followed up to December 31, 2010. High-resolution (1 × 1 km) yearly mean concentrations of PM2.5 were predicted from local monitoring data and US National Aeronautics and Space Administration satellite data using linear regression. Baseline residential PM2.5 exposure was used as a proxy for long-term exposure. We used Cox proportional hazards to evaluate the risk of incident stroke associated with PM2.5 exposure adjusted for potential confounders, including individual and neighborhood factors. Results: Over a mean follow-up of 9.4 years, we ascertained 6,733 cases of incident stroke, of which 3,526 (52.4%) were ischemic and 1,175 (17.5%) were hemorrhagic. The hazard ratio for every 10 μg/m3 higher PM2.5 concentration was statistically significant at 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.41) for ischemic and non-statistically significant at 0.90 (95% CI 0.70–1.17) for hemorrhagic stroke in fully adjusted model 3. The estimates for ischemic stroke were higher in older participants (>70 years), less educated participants, and in men for current smokers. Conclusion: Long-term PM2.5 exposure was associated with higher risk of incident ischemic stroke, but the association with incident hemorrhagic stroke was less clear.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.neurology.org-
dc.relation.ispartofNeurology-
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Neurology, 2017, v. 88 n. 18, p. 1709-1717-
dc.titleFine particulate matter exposure and incidence of stroke: A cohort study in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailQiu, H: qiuhong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, H: tsangh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTian, L: linweit@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338-
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, L=rp01991-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1212/WNL.0000000000003903-
dc.identifier.hkuros272471-
dc.identifier.volume88-
dc.identifier.issue18-
dc.identifier.spage1709-
dc.identifier.epage1717-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000400330500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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