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Article: A pain education programme to improve patient satisfaction with cancer pain management: A randomised control trial

TitleA pain education programme to improve patient satisfaction with cancer pain management: A randomised control trial
Authors
KeywordsMediator
Patient satisfaction
Pain management
Pain education programme
Nursing
Nurses
Barriers to pain management
Cancer pain
Issue Date2011
Citation
Journal of Clinical Nursing, 2011, v. 20, n. 13-14, p. 1858-1869 How to Cite?
AbstractAim. The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of a pain education programme to increase the satisfaction of patients with cancer with regard to pain management and (2) to examine how patient satisfaction with pain management mediates the barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. Background. The patients' satisfaction with pain management is not merely an indicator, it is actually a contributor to medication adherence. However, very few studies investigate methods for improving patient satisfaction with pain management. Design. This study used an experimental and longitudinal design. Methods. A total of 61 patient-family pairs (n=122) were randomly assigned to either experimental or control groups. The instruments included the American Pain Society outcome questionnaire, the Barriers Questionnaire-Taiwan form, self-reporting evaluations of analgesic adherence and the Pain Education Booklet. The experimental group (n=31) participated in a pain education programme, while those in the control group (n=30) did not. The two groups were compared using generalised estimation equations after the second and fourth weeks. A Sobel test was used to examine the mediating relationships among patient satisfaction with pain management, barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. Results. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in the level of satisfaction they felt for physicians and nurses regarding pain management. For those in the experimental group, satisfaction with pain management was a significant mediator between barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. Conclusions. This research provides evidence supporting the effectiveness of a pain education programme for patients and their family members in increasing patient satisfaction with regard to the management of cancer pain. Relevance to clinical practice. It is important for health providers to consider patient satisfaction when attempting to improve adherence to pain management regimes in a clinical setting. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241230
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.384
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.755

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, Pi Ling-
dc.contributor.authorLin, Chia Chin-
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-26T03:37:10Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-26T03:37:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Nursing, 2011, v. 20, n. 13-14, p. 1858-1869-
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241230-
dc.description.abstractAim. The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of a pain education programme to increase the satisfaction of patients with cancer with regard to pain management and (2) to examine how patient satisfaction with pain management mediates the barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. Background. The patients' satisfaction with pain management is not merely an indicator, it is actually a contributor to medication adherence. However, very few studies investigate methods for improving patient satisfaction with pain management. Design. This study used an experimental and longitudinal design. Methods. A total of 61 patient-family pairs (n=122) were randomly assigned to either experimental or control groups. The instruments included the American Pain Society outcome questionnaire, the Barriers Questionnaire-Taiwan form, self-reporting evaluations of analgesic adherence and the Pain Education Booklet. The experimental group (n=31) participated in a pain education programme, while those in the control group (n=30) did not. The two groups were compared using generalised estimation equations after the second and fourth weeks. A Sobel test was used to examine the mediating relationships among patient satisfaction with pain management, barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. Results. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in the level of satisfaction they felt for physicians and nurses regarding pain management. For those in the experimental group, satisfaction with pain management was a significant mediator between barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. Conclusions. This research provides evidence supporting the effectiveness of a pain education programme for patients and their family members in increasing patient satisfaction with regard to the management of cancer pain. Relevance to clinical practice. It is important for health providers to consider patient satisfaction when attempting to improve adherence to pain management regimes in a clinical setting. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Nursing-
dc.subjectMediator-
dc.subjectPatient satisfaction-
dc.subjectPain management-
dc.subjectPain education programme-
dc.subjectNursing-
dc.subjectNurses-
dc.subjectBarriers to pain management-
dc.subjectCancer pain-
dc.titleA pain education programme to improve patient satisfaction with cancer pain management: A randomised control trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03740.x-
dc.identifier.pmid21615576-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80955177478-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue13-14-
dc.identifier.spage1858-
dc.identifier.epage1869-
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2702-

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