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Article: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a teaching hospital in Hong Kong: Descriptive study using the Utstein style

TitleOut-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a teaching hospital in Hong Kong: Descriptive study using the Utstein style
Authors
KeywordsCardiopulmonary resuscitation
Ambulances
Ventricular fibrillation
Heart arrest
Emergency medical services
Issue Date2005
Citation
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine, 2005, v. 12, n. 3, p. 148-155 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To describe, using the Utstein template, the characteristics of patients presenting with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to a university teaching hospital in the New Territories of Hong Kong, and to evaluate survival. Design: Prospective study. Setting: The emergency department of a teaching hospital in the New Territories, Hong Kong. Participants: Patients older than 12 years with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were transported to the hospital between 1 July 2002 and 31 December 2002. Main outcome measures: Demographic data, characteristics of cardiac arrest and response time intervals of the emergency medical service presented according to the Utstein style, and also survival to hospital discharge rate. Results: A total of 124 patients were included (49.2% male; mean age 71.9 years). The majority of cardiac arrests occurred in patients' home. The overall bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rate was 15.3% (19/124). The most common electrocardiographic rhythm at scene was asystole, whilst pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) was found in 18.0%. The overall survival was 0.8% (1/124), and survival to hospital discharge was significantly higher for patients with VF or pulseless VT than those patients with other rhythms of cardiac arrest (11.1% versus 0%). The median witnessed/recognised collapse to defibrillation time was 14 minutes. The median prehospital time interval from collapse/recognition to arrival at hospital was 33 minutes. Conclusion: The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Hong Kong was poor. Major improvements in every component of the chain of survival are necessary.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/240719
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.153
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.173

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWai, Abraham Ka Chung-
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Chee Kay-
dc.contributor.authorMak, Paulina-
dc.contributor.authorRainer, Timothy Hudson-
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-12T01:46:40Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-12T01:46:40Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine, 2005, v. 12, n. 3, p. 148-155-
dc.identifier.issn1024-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/240719-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe, using the Utstein template, the characteristics of patients presenting with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to a university teaching hospital in the New Territories of Hong Kong, and to evaluate survival. Design: Prospective study. Setting: The emergency department of a teaching hospital in the New Territories, Hong Kong. Participants: Patients older than 12 years with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were transported to the hospital between 1 July 2002 and 31 December 2002. Main outcome measures: Demographic data, characteristics of cardiac arrest and response time intervals of the emergency medical service presented according to the Utstein style, and also survival to hospital discharge rate. Results: A total of 124 patients were included (49.2% male; mean age 71.9 years). The majority of cardiac arrests occurred in patients' home. The overall bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rate was 15.3% (19/124). The most common electrocardiographic rhythm at scene was asystole, whilst pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) was found in 18.0%. The overall survival was 0.8% (1/124), and survival to hospital discharge was significantly higher for patients with VF or pulseless VT than those patients with other rhythms of cardiac arrest (11.1% versus 0%). The median witnessed/recognised collapse to defibrillation time was 14 minutes. The median prehospital time interval from collapse/recognition to arrival at hospital was 33 minutes. Conclusion: The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Hong Kong was poor. Major improvements in every component of the chain of survival are necessary.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine-
dc.subjectCardiopulmonary resuscitation-
dc.subjectAmbulances-
dc.subjectVentricular fibrillation-
dc.subjectHeart arrest-
dc.subjectEmergency medical services-
dc.titleOut-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a teaching hospital in Hong Kong: Descriptive study using the Utstein style-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-22144472630-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage148-
dc.identifier.epage155-

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