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Article: Dilemma of modernity: Interrogating cross-border ethnic identities at China's southwest frontier

TitleDilemma of modernity: Interrogating cross-border ethnic identities at China's southwest frontier
Authors
Keywordsborder
Sino-Vietnamese border
Sino-Myanmar border
modernity
ethnic identity
cross-border mobility
Issue Date2016
Citation
Area, 2016 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2016 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).Recent theoretical advancement in human geography has reconceptualised the border as a process and becoming, which is appropriated and constructed by myriad actors to yield diverse and changing meanings, and accommodate various needs and interests. This enables us to appreciate the dual qualities of the border, both as a barrier to be overcome and an enabling factor for practices and meanings. In particular, cross-border mobility plays an essential role in mediating meanings of the border and identities of those whose lifeworlds are affected by the very existence of the border. On the one hand, mobilities transgress territorial orders imposed by official conceptions of the border. But, on the other hand, the distinctions between economic, social and political milieus at the two sides of the border may give rise to heightened senses of difference and lead to diverging identities. Building on these insights, this article argues for a more nuanced, dynamic understanding of the relationship between border crossing and belonging. It examines two empirical cases: the cross-border attendance of Huashan Festival celebration for Miao people at the Sino-Vietnamese borderland, and the trans-border mobility of Buddhist monks from the Myanmar city Muse to the Chinese border city Ruili. Overall, this paper argues that the potentials of the border to both connect and differentiate are inscribed in the lifeworlds in the borderlands in equally visible ways. Also, this paper adds some twists to Scott's thesis on Zomia, and argues that we must not downplay the importance of the frame of nation-states in shaping the lifeworlds of border inhabitants.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238165
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.349
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.938

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQian, Junxi-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Xueqiong-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-03T02:13:14Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-03T02:13:14Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationArea, 2016-
dc.identifier.issn0004-0894-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238165-
dc.description.abstract© 2016 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).Recent theoretical advancement in human geography has reconceptualised the border as a process and becoming, which is appropriated and constructed by myriad actors to yield diverse and changing meanings, and accommodate various needs and interests. This enables us to appreciate the dual qualities of the border, both as a barrier to be overcome and an enabling factor for practices and meanings. In particular, cross-border mobility plays an essential role in mediating meanings of the border and identities of those whose lifeworlds are affected by the very existence of the border. On the one hand, mobilities transgress territorial orders imposed by official conceptions of the border. But, on the other hand, the distinctions between economic, social and political milieus at the two sides of the border may give rise to heightened senses of difference and lead to diverging identities. Building on these insights, this article argues for a more nuanced, dynamic understanding of the relationship between border crossing and belonging. It examines two empirical cases: the cross-border attendance of Huashan Festival celebration for Miao people at the Sino-Vietnamese borderland, and the trans-border mobility of Buddhist monks from the Myanmar city Muse to the Chinese border city Ruili. Overall, this paper argues that the potentials of the border to both connect and differentiate are inscribed in the lifeworlds in the borderlands in equally visible ways. Also, this paper adds some twists to Scott's thesis on Zomia, and argues that we must not downplay the importance of the frame of nation-states in shaping the lifeworlds of border inhabitants.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofArea-
dc.subjectborder-
dc.subjectSino-Vietnamese border-
dc.subjectSino-Myanmar border-
dc.subjectmodernity-
dc.subjectethnic identity-
dc.subjectcross-border mobility-
dc.titleDilemma of modernity: Interrogating cross-border ethnic identities at China's southwest frontier-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/area.12283-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84995784747-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-
dc.identifier.eissn1475-4762-

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