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Article: Residential segregation and employment outcomes of rural migrant workers in China

TitleResidential segregation and employment outcomes of rural migrant workers in China
Authors
Keywordsspatial mismatch
employment outcomes
residential segregation
rural migrant workers
self-selection bias
spillover effects
Issue Date2015
Citation
Urban Studies, 2015, v. 53, n. 8, p. 1635-1656 How to Cite?
Abstract© Urban Studies Journal Limited 2015.In China, many rural migrant workers live in urbanising villages that are usually located in peripheral areas of major cities. Different from the spatial mismatch literature in which locations of minorities in the US are constrained by racial discrimination in the housing market, the residential segregation of rural migrant workers in China is largely due to China’s unique institutional context (e.g. land tenure system, hukou system) and the exclusionary housing regulations. Those living in these urbanising villages could incur both negative spatial mismatch effects and positive spillover effects. Through a survey across four mega-regions in China that are currently experiencing the most rapid urbanisation, we collect unique information on rural migrant workers’ attitudes towards living in urbanising villages, and therefore are able to address the self-selection bias that has broadly existed in many previous studies on residential segregation and spatial mismatch. The models show that the net effect of residential segregation in urbanising villages on migrant workers’ employment outcomes (both employment propensity and wage) appears to be positive, suggesting the spillover effects override the spatial mismatch effects. Current policy proposals by government officials to demolish urbanising villages should be accompanied by alternative policies to assist with housing migrant workers in appropriate locations that not only reduce spatial mismatch effects but also maintain positive spillover effects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238149
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.934
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.567

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Pengyu-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-03T02:13:12Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-03T02:13:12Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2015, v. 53, n. 8, p. 1635-1656-
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238149-
dc.description.abstract© Urban Studies Journal Limited 2015.In China, many rural migrant workers live in urbanising villages that are usually located in peripheral areas of major cities. Different from the spatial mismatch literature in which locations of minorities in the US are constrained by racial discrimination in the housing market, the residential segregation of rural migrant workers in China is largely due to China’s unique institutional context (e.g. land tenure system, hukou system) and the exclusionary housing regulations. Those living in these urbanising villages could incur both negative spatial mismatch effects and positive spillover effects. Through a survey across four mega-regions in China that are currently experiencing the most rapid urbanisation, we collect unique information on rural migrant workers’ attitudes towards living in urbanising villages, and therefore are able to address the self-selection bias that has broadly existed in many previous studies on residential segregation and spatial mismatch. The models show that the net effect of residential segregation in urbanising villages on migrant workers’ employment outcomes (both employment propensity and wage) appears to be positive, suggesting the spillover effects override the spatial mismatch effects. Current policy proposals by government officials to demolish urbanising villages should be accompanied by alternative policies to assist with housing migrant workers in appropriate locations that not only reduce spatial mismatch effects but also maintain positive spillover effects.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studies-
dc.subjectspatial mismatch-
dc.subjectemployment outcomes-
dc.subjectresidential segregation-
dc.subjectrural migrant workers-
dc.subjectself-selection bias-
dc.subjectspillover effects-
dc.titleResidential segregation and employment outcomes of rural migrant workers in China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0042098015578614-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84966701637-
dc.identifier.volume53-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage1635-
dc.identifier.epage1656-
dc.identifier.eissn1360-063X-

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