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Article: Molecular epidemiology of human enterovirus 71 at the origin of an epidemic of fatal hand, foot and mouth disease cases in Cambodia

TitleMolecular epidemiology of human enterovirus 71 at the origin of an epidemic of fatal hand, foot and mouth disease cases in Cambodia
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/emi/marketing/index.html
Citation
Emerging Microbes & Infections, 2016, v. 5, p. e104:1-9 How to Cite?
AbstractHuman enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). EV-A71 circulates in many countries and has caused large epidemics, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, since 1997. In April 2012, an undiagnosed fatal disease with neurological involvement and respiratory distress occurred in young children admitted to the Kantha Bopha Children's Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Most died within a day of hospital admission, causing public panic and international concern. In this study, we describe the enterovirus (EV) genotypes that were isolated during the outbreak in 2012 and the following year. From June 2012 to November 2013, 312 specimens were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory patients and tested by generic EV and specific EV-A71 reverse transcription PCR. EV-A71 was detected in 208 clinical specimens while other EVs were found in 32 patients. The VP1 gene and/or the complete genome were generated. Our phylogenetic sequencing analysis demonstrated that 80 EV-A71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenotype and 3 EV-A71 strains belonged to the B5 genotype. Furthermore, some lineages of EV-A71 were found to have appeared in Cambodia following separate introductions from neighboring countries. Nineteen EV A (CV-A6 and CV-A16), 9 EV B (EV-B83, CV-B3, CV-B2, CV-A9, E-31, E-2 and EV-B80) and 4 EV C (EV-C116, EV-C96, CV-A20 and Vaccine-related PV-3) strains were also detected. We found no molecular markers of disease severity. We report here that EV-A71 genotype C4 was the main etiological agent of a large outbreak of HFMD and particularly of severe forms associated with central nervous system infections. The role played by other EVs in the epidemic could not be clearly established.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237731
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.012
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.774

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDuong, V-
dc.contributor.authorMey, C-
dc.contributor.authorEloit, M-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, H-
dc.contributor.authorDanet, L-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Z-
dc.contributor.authorZou, G-
dc.contributor.authorTarantola, A-
dc.contributor.authorCheval, J-
dc.contributor.authorPerot, P-
dc.contributor.authorLaurent, D-
dc.contributor.authorRichner, B-
dc.contributor.authorKy, S-
dc.contributor.authorHeng, S-
dc.contributor.authorTouch, S-
dc.contributor.authorSovann, L-
dc.contributor.authorvan Doorn, R-
dc.contributor.authorTan Tran, T-
dc.contributor.authorFarrar, JJ-
dc.contributor.authorWentworth, DE-
dc.contributor.authorDas, SR-
dc.contributor.authorStockwell, TB-
dc.contributor.authorManuguerra, JC-
dc.contributor.authorDelpeyroux, F-
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y-
dc.contributor.authorAltmeyer, R-
dc.contributor.authorBuchy, P-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-20T02:27:37Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-20T02:27:37Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Microbes & Infections, 2016, v. 5, p. e104:1-9-
dc.identifier.issn2222-1751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237731-
dc.description.abstractHuman enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). EV-A71 circulates in many countries and has caused large epidemics, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, since 1997. In April 2012, an undiagnosed fatal disease with neurological involvement and respiratory distress occurred in young children admitted to the Kantha Bopha Children's Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Most died within a day of hospital admission, causing public panic and international concern. In this study, we describe the enterovirus (EV) genotypes that were isolated during the outbreak in 2012 and the following year. From June 2012 to November 2013, 312 specimens were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory patients and tested by generic EV and specific EV-A71 reverse transcription PCR. EV-A71 was detected in 208 clinical specimens while other EVs were found in 32 patients. The VP1 gene and/or the complete genome were generated. Our phylogenetic sequencing analysis demonstrated that 80 EV-A71 strains belonged to the C4a subgenotype and 3 EV-A71 strains belonged to the B5 genotype. Furthermore, some lineages of EV-A71 were found to have appeared in Cambodia following separate introductions from neighboring countries. Nineteen EV A (CV-A6 and CV-A16), 9 EV B (EV-B83, CV-B3, CV-B2, CV-A9, E-31, E-2 and EV-B80) and 4 EV C (EV-C116, EV-C96, CV-A20 and Vaccine-related PV-3) strains were also detected. We found no molecular markers of disease severity. We report here that EV-A71 genotype C4 was the main etiological agent of a large outbreak of HFMD and particularly of severe forms associated with central nervous system infections. The role played by other EVs in the epidemic could not be clearly established.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/emi/marketing/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofEmerging Microbes & Infections-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleMolecular epidemiology of human enterovirus 71 at the origin of an epidemic of fatal hand, foot and mouth disease cases in Cambodia-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhu, H: zhuhch@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhu, H=rp01535-
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/emi.2016.101-
dc.identifier.hkuros271028-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.spagee104:1-
dc.identifier.epage9-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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