File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review

TitleInterventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review
Authors
KeywordsIntervention
Suicide prevention
Suicide hotspots
Issue Date2013
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
BMC Public Health, 2013, v. 13, n. 1, article no. 214 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: 'Suicide hotspots' include tall structures (for example, bridges and cliffs), railway tracks, and isolated locations (for example, rural car parks) which offer direct means for suicide or seclusion that prevents intervention. Methods. We searched Medline for studies that could inform the following question: 'What interventions are available to reduce suicides at hotspots, and are they effective?'. Results: There are four main approaches: (a) restricting access to means (through installation of physical barriers); (b) encouraging help-seeking (by placement of signs and telephones); (c) increasing the likelihood of intervention by a third party (through surveillance and staff training); and (d) encouraging responsible media reporting of suicide (through guidelines for journalists). There is relatively strong evidence that reducing access to means can avert suicides at hotspots without substitution effects. The evidence is weaker for the other approaches, although they show promise. Conclusions: More well-designed intervention studies are needed to strengthen this evidence base. © 2013 Cox et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237726
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 2.567
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.230
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCox, GR-
dc.contributor.authorOwens, C-
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, J-
dc.contributor.authorNicholas, A-
dc.contributor.authorLockley, A-
dc.contributor.authorWiliamson, M-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YTD-
dc.contributor.authorPirkis, J-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-20T02:27:31Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-20T02:27:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2013, v. 13, n. 1, article no. 214-
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237726-
dc.description.abstractBackground: 'Suicide hotspots' include tall structures (for example, bridges and cliffs), railway tracks, and isolated locations (for example, rural car parks) which offer direct means for suicide or seclusion that prevents intervention. Methods. We searched Medline for studies that could inform the following question: 'What interventions are available to reduce suicides at hotspots, and are they effective?'. Results: There are four main approaches: (a) restricting access to means (through installation of physical barriers); (b) encouraging help-seeking (by placement of signs and telephones); (c) increasing the likelihood of intervention by a third party (through surveillance and staff training); and (d) encouraging responsible media reporting of suicide (through guidelines for journalists). There is relatively strong evidence that reducing access to means can avert suicides at hotspots without substitution effects. The evidence is weaker for the other approaches, although they show promise. Conclusions: More well-designed intervention studies are needed to strengthen this evidence base. © 2013 Cox et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Health-
dc.rightsBMC Public Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectIntervention-
dc.subjectSuicide prevention-
dc.subjectSuicide hotspots-
dc.titleInterventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, YTD: takderek@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-13-214-
dc.identifier.pmid23496989-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84874741974-
dc.identifier.hkuros270965-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 214-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 214-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000317115600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1471-2458-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats