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Article: Radiographic study of the mandibular retromolar canal: An anatomic structure with clinical importance

TitleRadiographic study of the mandibular retromolar canal: An anatomic structure with clinical importance
Authors
Keywordsretromolar canal
mandibular anatomy
Accessory innervation
retromolar foramen
Issue Date2011
Citation
Journal of Endodontics, 2011, v. 37, n. 12, p. 1630-1635 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The retromolar canal is an anatomic structure of the mandible with clinical importance. This canal branches off from the mandibular canal behind the third molar and travels to the retromolar foramen in the retromolar fossa. The retromolar canal might conduct accessory innervation to the mandibular molars or contain an aberrant buccal nerve. Methods: Patients referred for panoramic radiography were consecutively enrolled, provided a limited cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan had also been taken in the area of interest. Radiographs were retrospectively screened for the presence of a retromolar canal, and linear measurements (distance to second molar, height, width) were taken. Results: One hundred twenty-one sides in 100 patients were evaluated (100 unilateral and 21 bilateral cases). A total of 31 retromolar canals were identified with CBCT (25.6%). Only 7 of these canals were also seen on the corresponding panoramic radiographs. The existence of a retromolar canal was not statistically related to gender or side. With regard to the linear measurements, the mean distance from the retromolar canal to the second molar was 15.16 mm (±2.39 mm), the mean height of the canal was 11.34 mm (±2.36 mm), and the mean width was 0.99 mm (±0.31 mm). Conclusions: This radiographic study documents a frequency of 25% for the presence of a retromolar canal. The clinician is advised to preserve this anatomic variation when performing surgery in the retromolar area and to consider additional locoregional anesthesia in the case of failed mandibular block anesthesia. © 2011 American Association of Endodontists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/236187
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.886
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.681
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVon Arx, Thomas-
dc.contributor.authorHänni, Andrea-
dc.contributor.authorSendi, Pedram-
dc.contributor.authorBuser, Daniel-
dc.contributor.authorBornstein, Michael M.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-11T07:43:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-11T07:43:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Endodontics, 2011, v. 37, n. 12, p. 1630-1635-
dc.identifier.issn0099-2399-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/236187-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The retromolar canal is an anatomic structure of the mandible with clinical importance. This canal branches off from the mandibular canal behind the third molar and travels to the retromolar foramen in the retromolar fossa. The retromolar canal might conduct accessory innervation to the mandibular molars or contain an aberrant buccal nerve. Methods: Patients referred for panoramic radiography were consecutively enrolled, provided a limited cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan had also been taken in the area of interest. Radiographs were retrospectively screened for the presence of a retromolar canal, and linear measurements (distance to second molar, height, width) were taken. Results: One hundred twenty-one sides in 100 patients were evaluated (100 unilateral and 21 bilateral cases). A total of 31 retromolar canals were identified with CBCT (25.6%). Only 7 of these canals were also seen on the corresponding panoramic radiographs. The existence of a retromolar canal was not statistically related to gender or side. With regard to the linear measurements, the mean distance from the retromolar canal to the second molar was 15.16 mm (±2.39 mm), the mean height of the canal was 11.34 mm (±2.36 mm), and the mean width was 0.99 mm (±0.31 mm). Conclusions: This radiographic study documents a frequency of 25% for the presence of a retromolar canal. The clinician is advised to preserve this anatomic variation when performing surgery in the retromolar area and to consider additional locoregional anesthesia in the case of failed mandibular block anesthesia. © 2011 American Association of Endodontists.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Endodontics-
dc.subjectretromolar canal-
dc.subjectmandibular anatomy-
dc.subjectAccessory innervation-
dc.subjectretromolar foramen-
dc.titleRadiographic study of the mandibular retromolar canal: An anatomic structure with clinical importance-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.joen.2011.09.007-
dc.identifier.pmid22099895-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81755165837-
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage1630-
dc.identifier.epage1635-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298126400006-

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