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Conference Paper: Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma - is this the best option?

TitleLiver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma - is this the best option?
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherMalaysian Society of Gastroenterology & Hepatology.
Citation
Annual Scientific Congress of Malaysian Society of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (MSGH): GUT 2016, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 22-24 July 2016. In Souvenir Programme and Abstract Book, p. 40 How to Cite?
AbstractHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the Asia-Pacific region. Liver transplantation (LT) offers the highest potential for cure when compared to all other available treatment modalities. In addition, LT offers a cure for those with established cirrhosis, and removes any future potential development of metachronous HCCs. On these facts alone, LT would appear to be the best treatment option for HCC patients. In fact, LT is often the only curative option available, particularly for those with advanced cirrhosis not amenable to surgical resection or locoregional therapies. For these patients, LT is the best option if the HCC is within the adopted criteria. However, despite the use of well-tested selection criteria, recurrence of HCC can occur with significant reduction in long-term survival. Other parameters beyond tumour size and number, including AFP and specific characteristics on imaging, may also have a role in determining which patients will benefit most from LT. Furthermore, organ shortage remains the single most important restriction in most transplant programs, and eligible wait-listed patients may still succumb to disease progression, even with the use of bridging therapy. Unfortunately, current existing eligibility criteria for LT in HCC patients are not individualized, and may in fact not identify the best patients, as some within criteria may display other characteristic tumor features associated with poor outcomes after transplantation. On the other hand, ineligible patients beyond the adopted criteria may not have compromised long-term outcome upon careful selection.
DescriptionSymposium 5 – HCC
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/235754

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFung, JYY-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-17T02:56:13Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-17T02:56:13Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationAnnual Scientific Congress of Malaysian Society of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (MSGH): GUT 2016, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 22-24 July 2016. In Souvenir Programme and Abstract Book, p. 40-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/235754-
dc.descriptionSymposium 5 – HCC-
dc.description.abstractHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the Asia-Pacific region. Liver transplantation (LT) offers the highest potential for cure when compared to all other available treatment modalities. In addition, LT offers a cure for those with established cirrhosis, and removes any future potential development of metachronous HCCs. On these facts alone, LT would appear to be the best treatment option for HCC patients. In fact, LT is often the only curative option available, particularly for those with advanced cirrhosis not amenable to surgical resection or locoregional therapies. For these patients, LT is the best option if the HCC is within the adopted criteria. However, despite the use of well-tested selection criteria, recurrence of HCC can occur with significant reduction in long-term survival. Other parameters beyond tumour size and number, including AFP and specific characteristics on imaging, may also have a role in determining which patients will benefit most from LT. Furthermore, organ shortage remains the single most important restriction in most transplant programs, and eligible wait-listed patients may still succumb to disease progression, even with the use of bridging therapy. Unfortunately, current existing eligibility criteria for LT in HCC patients are not individualized, and may in fact not identify the best patients, as some within criteria may display other characteristic tumor features associated with poor outcomes after transplantation. On the other hand, ineligible patients beyond the adopted criteria may not have compromised long-term outcome upon careful selection.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMalaysian Society of Gastroenterology & Hepatology. -
dc.relation.ispartofMalaysian Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Annual Scientific Congress (MSGH): GUT 2016-
dc.titleLiver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma - is this the best option?-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailFung, JYY: jfung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFung, JYY=rp00518-
dc.identifier.hkuros260423-
dc.identifier.spage40-
dc.identifier.epage40-
dc.publisher.placeMalaysia-

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