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Book Chapter: Metaphor, travel, and the (un)making of the steppe

TitleMetaphor, travel, and the (un)making of the steppe
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Citation
Metaphor, travel, and the (un)making of the steppe. In Julia Kuehn & Paul Smethurst (Eds.), New Directions in Travel Writing Studies, p. 71-82. Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractIn contrasting two pieces of contemporary travel writing on Central Asia — Jeffrey Tayler’s Murderers in Mausoleums (2009) and Christopher Robbins’s Apples are from Kazakhstan (2008) — this chapter examines two organizing spatial metaphors with particular relevance to travel writing: the network and the meshwork. While each text refers to the same topography, they tend towards one or other of these metaphors in representing how the spaces of the steppe are imagined and lived. The result is that each yields places that are worlds apart, and the Central Asian setting becomes a disputed space not only geopolitically, but also through the manner of its representation. The conflict among metaphors has implications for the whole of contemporary travel writing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/235349
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGualtieri, JJ-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T13:52:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-14T13:52:44Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationMetaphor, travel, and the (un)making of the steppe. In Julia Kuehn & Paul Smethurst (Eds.), New Directions in Travel Writing Studies, p. 71-82. Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-
dc.identifier.isbn9781137457578-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/235349-
dc.description.abstractIn contrasting two pieces of contemporary travel writing on Central Asia — Jeffrey Tayler’s Murderers in Mausoleums (2009) and Christopher Robbins’s Apples are from Kazakhstan (2008) — this chapter examines two organizing spatial metaphors with particular relevance to travel writing: the network and the meshwork. While each text refers to the same topography, they tend towards one or other of these metaphors in representing how the spaces of the steppe are imagined and lived. The result is that each yields places that are worlds apart, and the Central Asian setting becomes a disputed space not only geopolitically, but also through the manner of its representation. The conflict among metaphors has implications for the whole of contemporary travel writing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan-
dc.relation.ispartofNew Directions in Travel Writing Studies-
dc.titleMetaphor, travel, and the (un)making of the steppe-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/9781137457257_5-
dc.identifier.hkuros268265-
dc.identifier.spage71-
dc.identifier.epage82-
dc.publisher.placeBasingstoke, Hampshire, UK-

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