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Article: The Effect of Social Exclusion On Consumer Preference for Anthropomorphized Brands

TitleThe Effect of Social Exclusion On Consumer Preference for Anthropomorphized Brands
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/713950/description#description
Citation
Journal of Consumer Psychology, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractPrior research has mainly examined the effect of social exclusion on individuals' interactions with other people or on their product choices as an instrument to facilitate interpersonal connection. The current research takes a novel perspective by proposing that socially excluded consumers would be more motivated to establish a relationship with a brand (rather than using the brand to socially connect with other people) when the brand exhibits human-like features. Based on this premise, we predict and find support in three studies that socially excluded consumers, compared with non-excluded consumers, exhibit greater preference for anthropomorphized brands (studies 1-3). This effect is mediated by consumers' need for social affiliation and is moderated by the opportunity for social connection with other people (study 2). Furthermore, socially excluded consumers differ in the types of relationships they would like to build with anthropomorphized brands, depending on their attributions about the exclusion. Specifically, consumers who blame themselves (others) for being socially excluded show greater preference for anthropomorphized partner (fling) brands (study 3).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/234120
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.009
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.973

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, RP-
dc.contributor.authorWan, WE-
dc.contributor.authorLevy, E-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T06:59:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-14T06:59:10Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Consumer Psychology, 2016-
dc.identifier.issn1057-7408-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/234120-
dc.description.abstractPrior research has mainly examined the effect of social exclusion on individuals' interactions with other people or on their product choices as an instrument to facilitate interpersonal connection. The current research takes a novel perspective by proposing that socially excluded consumers would be more motivated to establish a relationship with a brand (rather than using the brand to socially connect with other people) when the brand exhibits human-like features. Based on this premise, we predict and find support in three studies that socially excluded consumers, compared with non-excluded consumers, exhibit greater preference for anthropomorphized brands (studies 1-3). This effect is mediated by consumers' need for social affiliation and is moderated by the opportunity for social connection with other people (study 2). Furthermore, socially excluded consumers differ in the types of relationships they would like to build with anthropomorphized brands, depending on their attributions about the exclusion. Specifically, consumers who blame themselves (others) for being socially excluded show greater preference for anthropomorphized partner (fling) brands (study 3).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/713950/description#description-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Consumer Psychology-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.titleThe Effect of Social Exclusion On Consumer Preference for Anthropomorphized Brands-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWan, WE: ewan@business.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWan, WE=rp01105-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcps.2016.05.004-
dc.identifier.hkuros267724-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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