File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Is Trust Always Better than Distrust? The Potential Value of Distrust in Newer Virtual Teams Engaged in Short-Term Decision-Making

TitleIs Trust Always Better than Distrust? The Potential Value of Distrust in Newer Virtual Teams Engaged in Short-Term Decision-Making
Authors
KeywordsDecision making
Decision quality
Distrust
Team performance
Trust
Virtual teams
Issue Date2015
Citation
Group Decision and Negotiation, 2015, v. 24, n. 4, p. 723-752 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.The debate on the benefits of trust or distrust in groups has generated a substantial amount of research that points to the positive aspects of trust in groups, and generally characterizes distrust as a negative group phenomenon. Therefore, many researchers and practitioners assume that trust is inherently good and distrust is inherently bad. However, recent counterintuitive evidence obtained from face-to-face (FtF) groups indicates that the opposite might be true; trust can prove detrimental, and distrust instrumental, to decision-making in groups. By extending this argument to virtual teams (VTs), we examined the value of distrust for VTs completing routine and non-routine decision tasks, and showed that the benefits of distrust can extend to short-term VTs. Specifically, VTs seeded with distrust significantly outperformed all control groups in a non-routine decision-making task. In addition, we present quantitative evidence to show that the decision task itself can significantly affect the overall levels of trust/distrust within VTs. In addition to its practical and research implications, the theoretical contribution of our study is that it extends to a group level, and then to a VT setting, a theory of distrust previously tested in the psychology literature in the context of completing non-routine and routine decision tasks at an individual level.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233847
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.312
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Paul Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorSchuetzler, Ryan M.-
dc.contributor.authorGiboney, Justin Scott-
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Thomas A.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T07:21:48Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T07:21:48Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationGroup Decision and Negotiation, 2015, v. 24, n. 4, p. 723-752-
dc.identifier.issn0926-2644-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233847-
dc.description.abstract© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.The debate on the benefits of trust or distrust in groups has generated a substantial amount of research that points to the positive aspects of trust in groups, and generally characterizes distrust as a negative group phenomenon. Therefore, many researchers and practitioners assume that trust is inherently good and distrust is inherently bad. However, recent counterintuitive evidence obtained from face-to-face (FtF) groups indicates that the opposite might be true; trust can prove detrimental, and distrust instrumental, to decision-making in groups. By extending this argument to virtual teams (VTs), we examined the value of distrust for VTs completing routine and non-routine decision tasks, and showed that the benefits of distrust can extend to short-term VTs. Specifically, VTs seeded with distrust significantly outperformed all control groups in a non-routine decision-making task. In addition, we present quantitative evidence to show that the decision task itself can significantly affect the overall levels of trust/distrust within VTs. In addition to its practical and research implications, the theoretical contribution of our study is that it extends to a group level, and then to a VT setting, a theory of distrust previously tested in the psychology literature in the context of completing non-routine and routine decision tasks at an individual level.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofGroup Decision and Negotiation-
dc.subjectDecision making-
dc.subjectDecision quality-
dc.subjectDistrust-
dc.subjectTeam performance-
dc.subjectTrust-
dc.subjectVirtual teams-
dc.titleIs Trust Always Better than Distrust? The Potential Value of Distrust in Newer Virtual Teams Engaged in Short-Term Decision-Making-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10726-014-9410-x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84930934556-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage723-
dc.identifier.epage752-
dc.identifier.eissn1572-9907-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats