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Article: Is Your Banker Leaking Your Personal Information? The Roles of Ethics and Individual-Level Cultural Characteristics in Predicting Organizational Computer Abuse

TitleIs Your Banker Leaking Your Personal Information? The Roles of Ethics and Individual-Level Cultural Characteristics in Predicting Organizational Computer Abuse
Authors
KeywordsTeleological evaluations
Information security
Collectivism
Computer abuse
Culture
Deontological evaluations
Ethics
Formalism
Individualism
Utilitarianism
Organizational security
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Business Ethics, 2014, v. 121, n. 3, p. 385-401 How to Cite?
AbstractComputer abuse (CA) by employees is a critical concern for managers. Misuse of an organization's information assets leads to costly damage to an organization's reputation, decreases in sales, and impositions of fines. We use this opportunity to introduce and expand the theoretic framework proffered by Thong and Yap (1998) to better understand the factors that lead individuals to commit CA in organizations. The study uses a survey of 449 respondents from the banking, financial, and insurance industries. Our results indicate that individuals who adhere to a formalist ethical perspective are significantly less likely to engage in CA activities than those following a utilitarian ethical framework. In addition, the results provide evidence that employees with individualistic natures are linked to increased CA incidents, whereas collectivist tendencies are associated with decreases in CA behaviors. Our results also show that collectivism acts as a strong moderator that further decreases the relationships between formalism and CA, and utilitarianism and CA. Finally, we offer detailed suggestions on how organizations and researchers can leverage our findings to decrease CA occurrences. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233839
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.837
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.358

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Paul Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorPosey, Clay-
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Tom L.-
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Rebecca J.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T07:21:47Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T07:21:47Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Business Ethics, 2014, v. 121, n. 3, p. 385-401-
dc.identifier.issn0167-4544-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233839-
dc.description.abstractComputer abuse (CA) by employees is a critical concern for managers. Misuse of an organization's information assets leads to costly damage to an organization's reputation, decreases in sales, and impositions of fines. We use this opportunity to introduce and expand the theoretic framework proffered by Thong and Yap (1998) to better understand the factors that lead individuals to commit CA in organizations. The study uses a survey of 449 respondents from the banking, financial, and insurance industries. Our results indicate that individuals who adhere to a formalist ethical perspective are significantly less likely to engage in CA activities than those following a utilitarian ethical framework. In addition, the results provide evidence that employees with individualistic natures are linked to increased CA incidents, whereas collectivist tendencies are associated with decreases in CA behaviors. Our results also show that collectivism acts as a strong moderator that further decreases the relationships between formalism and CA, and utilitarianism and CA. Finally, we offer detailed suggestions on how organizations and researchers can leverage our findings to decrease CA occurrences. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Business Ethics-
dc.subjectTeleological evaluations-
dc.subjectInformation security-
dc.subjectCollectivism-
dc.subjectComputer abuse-
dc.subjectCulture-
dc.subjectDeontological evaluations-
dc.subjectEthics-
dc.subjectFormalism-
dc.subjectIndividualism-
dc.subjectUtilitarianism-
dc.subjectOrganizational security-
dc.titleIs Your Banker Leaking Your Personal Information? The Roles of Ethics and Individual-Level Cultural Characteristics in Predicting Organizational Computer Abuse-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10551-013-1705-3-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84901351658-
dc.identifier.volume121-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage385-
dc.identifier.epage401-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-0697-

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