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Conference Paper: Reducing unauthorized access by insiders through user interface design: Making end users accountable

TitleReducing unauthorized access by insiders through user interface design: Making end users accountable
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2011, p. 4623-4632 How to Cite?
AbstractA long-time tenet of information security is the principle of least privilege, which requires that systems users be given the minimum amount of access privilege required to complete a task. However, many financial, medical, and customer records systems grant employees broad access for reasons of practical necessity. Unfortunately, with broad access rights comes potential for abuse. This paper investigates how user interface design features of a system can be designed to make end users feel more accountable for their actions in the system and less likely to abuse their access rights. To do so, we developed a factorial survey to determine the effects of user interface design features relating to three aspects of accountability: (1) identifiability, (2) evaluation, and (3) social presence. The results of the factorial survey show that the accountability design features significantly reduced intention to commit unauthorized access. © 2012 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233810
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVance, Anthony-
dc.contributor.authorMolyneux, Braden-
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Paul Benjamin-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T07:21:42Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T07:21:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2011, p. 4623-4632-
dc.identifier.issn1530-1605-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233810-
dc.description.abstractA long-time tenet of information security is the principle of least privilege, which requires that systems users be given the minimum amount of access privilege required to complete a task. However, many financial, medical, and customer records systems grant employees broad access for reasons of practical necessity. Unfortunately, with broad access rights comes potential for abuse. This paper investigates how user interface design features of a system can be designed to make end users feel more accountable for their actions in the system and less likely to abuse their access rights. To do so, we developed a factorial survey to determine the effects of user interface design features relating to three aspects of accountability: (1) identifiability, (2) evaluation, and (3) social presence. The results of the factorial survey show that the accountability design features significantly reduced intention to commit unauthorized access. © 2012 IEEE.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences-
dc.titleReducing unauthorized access by insiders through user interface design: Making end users accountable-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/HICSS.2012.499-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857970675-
dc.identifier.spage4623-
dc.identifier.epage4632-

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