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Article: Urban princesses: Performance and "Women's Language" in Japan's Gothic/Lolita subculture

TitleUrban princesses: Performance and "Women's Language" in Japan's Gothic/Lolita subculture
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, 2008, v. 18, n. 1, p. 130-150 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper investigates the linguistic strategies used in the counterpublic discourse of Gothic/Lolita, a young Japanese women's subculture of the late 1990s and early 2000s, and explores how the subculture and its practices are characterized by the Japanese media. Particular attention is paid to how subcultural magazines, websites, and Gothic/Lolitas themselves create and sustain a "virtual linguistic community" through a specialized lexicon of neologisms and re-appropriated "women's language," as well as negative identity practices that seek to define Gothic/Lolita against other subcultures and fashions such as kosupure ["Cosplay" i.e., Costume Play]. Additionally, an analysis of representations of Gothic/ Lolita speech in two television programs reveals how the media constructs ambivalent images via iconization and erasure through narration and editing. © 2008 American Anthropological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233791
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.912
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.828

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGagné, Isaac-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T07:21:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T07:21:39Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Linguistic Anthropology, 2008, v. 18, n. 1, p. 130-150-
dc.identifier.issn1055-1360-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233791-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the linguistic strategies used in the counterpublic discourse of Gothic/Lolita, a young Japanese women's subculture of the late 1990s and early 2000s, and explores how the subculture and its practices are characterized by the Japanese media. Particular attention is paid to how subcultural magazines, websites, and Gothic/Lolitas themselves create and sustain a "virtual linguistic community" through a specialized lexicon of neologisms and re-appropriated "women's language," as well as negative identity practices that seek to define Gothic/Lolita against other subcultures and fashions such as kosupure ["Cosplay" i.e., Costume Play]. Additionally, an analysis of representations of Gothic/ Lolita speech in two television programs reveals how the media constructs ambivalent images via iconization and erasure through narration and editing. © 2008 American Anthropological Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Linguistic Anthropology-
dc.titleUrban princesses: Performance and "Women's Language" in Japan's Gothic/Lolita subculture-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1548-1395.2008.00006.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48649097700-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage130-
dc.identifier.epage150-
dc.identifier.eissn1548-1395-

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