File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Culture and media effects on group decision making under majority influence

TitleCulture and media effects on group decision making under majority influence
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2006, v. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of this study is to address questions on how collectivistic and individualistic cultures affect majority influence in a group decision making task when there are differences in media richness. We developed a theory that explains and predicts these phenomena, and tested hypotheses using 112 fourperson groups that consisted of Chinese and U.S. participants. As predicted, we found strong evidence indicating that there were significant differences between Chinese and U.S. groups, with Chinese groups being more prone to follow the view of majority. Further, traditional face-to-face (FtF) unsupported groups experienced the strongest majority influence. We found that GSS use helped diminish majority influence in both Chinese and U.S. groups. These findings have broad theoretical and applied implications, which are discussed in this paper. © 2006 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233770
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Dongsong-
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Paul Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorFu, Xiaolan-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Lina-
dc.contributor.authorAdipat, Boonlit-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T07:21:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T07:21:36Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2006, v. 1-
dc.identifier.issn1530-1605-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233770-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to address questions on how collectivistic and individualistic cultures affect majority influence in a group decision making task when there are differences in media richness. We developed a theory that explains and predicts these phenomena, and tested hypotheses using 112 fourperson groups that consisted of Chinese and U.S. participants. As predicted, we found strong evidence indicating that there were significant differences between Chinese and U.S. groups, with Chinese groups being more prone to follow the view of majority. Further, traditional face-to-face (FtF) unsupported groups experienced the strongest majority influence. We found that GSS use helped diminish majority influence in both Chinese and U.S. groups. These findings have broad theoretical and applied implications, which are discussed in this paper. © 2006 IEEE.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences-
dc.titleCulture and media effects on group decision making under majority influence-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/HICSS.2006.109-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749594256-
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats