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Article: Is Trust Always Better than Distrust? The Potential Value of Distrust in Newer Virtual Teams Engaged in Short-Term Decision-Making

TitleIs Trust Always Better than Distrust? The Potential Value of Distrust in Newer Virtual Teams Engaged in Short-Term Decision-Making
Authors
KeywordsDecision making
Decision quality
Distrust
Team performance
Trust
Virtual teams
Issue Date2014
Citation
Group Decision and Negotiation, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractThe debate on the benefits of trust or distrust in groups has generated a substantial amount of research that points to the positive aspects of trust in groups, and generally characterizes distrust as a negative group phenomenon. Therefore, many researchers and practitioners assume that trust is inherently good and distrust is inherently bad. However, recent counterintuitive evidence obtained from face-to-face (FtF) groups indicates that the opposite might be true; trust can prove detrimental, and distrust instrumental, to decision-making in groups. By extending this argument to virtual teams (VTs), we examined the value of distrust for VTs completing routine and non-routine decision tasks, and showed that the benefits of distrust can extend to short-term VTs. Specifically, VTs seeded with distrust significantly outperformed all control groups in a non-routine decision-making task. In addition, we present quantitative evidence to show that the decision task itself can significantly affect the overall levels of trust/distrust within VTs. In addition to its practical and research implications, the theoretical contribution of our study is that it extends to a group level, and then to a VT setting, a theory of distrust previously tested in the psychology literature in the context of completing non-routine and routine decision tasks at an individual level. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233739
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.312
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Paul Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorSchuetzler, Ryan M.-
dc.contributor.authorGiboney, Justin Scott-
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Thomas A.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T07:21:31Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T07:21:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationGroup Decision and Negotiation, 2014-
dc.identifier.issn0926-2644-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233739-
dc.description.abstractThe debate on the benefits of trust or distrust in groups has generated a substantial amount of research that points to the positive aspects of trust in groups, and generally characterizes distrust as a negative group phenomenon. Therefore, many researchers and practitioners assume that trust is inherently good and distrust is inherently bad. However, recent counterintuitive evidence obtained from face-to-face (FtF) groups indicates that the opposite might be true; trust can prove detrimental, and distrust instrumental, to decision-making in groups. By extending this argument to virtual teams (VTs), we examined the value of distrust for VTs completing routine and non-routine decision tasks, and showed that the benefits of distrust can extend to short-term VTs. Specifically, VTs seeded with distrust significantly outperformed all control groups in a non-routine decision-making task. In addition, we present quantitative evidence to show that the decision task itself can significantly affect the overall levels of trust/distrust within VTs. In addition to its practical and research implications, the theoretical contribution of our study is that it extends to a group level, and then to a VT setting, a theory of distrust previously tested in the psychology literature in the context of completing non-routine and routine decision tasks at an individual level. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofGroup Decision and Negotiation-
dc.subjectDecision making-
dc.subjectDecision quality-
dc.subjectDistrust-
dc.subjectTeam performance-
dc.subjectTrust-
dc.subjectVirtual teams-
dc.titleIs Trust Always Better than Distrust? The Potential Value of Distrust in Newer Virtual Teams Engaged in Short-Term Decision-Making-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10726-014-9410-x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84906430488-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-
dc.identifier.eissn1572-9907-

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