File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Supplementary

Book: Wanton Women in Late-Imperial Chinese Literature: Models, Genres, Subversions and Traditions

TitleWanton Women in Late-Imperial Chinese Literature: Models, Genres, Subversions and Traditions
Authors
KeywordsLiterature and Cultural Studies
Asian Studies
Gender Studies
Chinese History
Issue Date2017
PublisherBrill
Citation
Stevenson, M & Wu, C (eds.), Wanton Women in Late-Imperial Chinese Literature: Models, Genres, Subversions and Traditions. Leiden: Brill. 2017 How to Cite?
AbstractThe contributors to Wanton Women in Late-Imperial Chinese Literature: Models, Genres, Subversions and Traditions draw attention to ‘wanton woman’ themes across time as they were portrayed in court history (McMahon), fiction (Stevenson), drama (Lam, Wu), and songs and ballads (Ôki, Epstein, McLaren). Looking back, the essays challenge us with views of sexual transgression that are more heterogeneous than modern popular focus on Pan Jinlian would suggest. Central among the many insights to be found is that despite gender performance in Chinese history being overwhelmingly determined by the needs of patriarchal authority, men and women in the late imperial period discovered diverse ways in which to reflect on how men constantly sought their own bearings in reference to women.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233487
ISBN
Series/Report no.Women and Gender in China Studies ; v. 8

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, M-
dc.contributor.authorWu, C-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:37:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:37:07Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationStevenson, M & Wu, C (eds.), Wanton Women in Late-Imperial Chinese Literature: Models, Genres, Subversions and Traditions. Leiden: Brill. 2017-
dc.identifier.isbn9789004339156-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233487-
dc.description.abstractThe contributors to Wanton Women in Late-Imperial Chinese Literature: Models, Genres, Subversions and Traditions draw attention to ‘wanton woman’ themes across time as they were portrayed in court history (McMahon), fiction (Stevenson), drama (Lam, Wu), and songs and ballads (Ôki, Epstein, McLaren). Looking back, the essays challenge us with views of sexual transgression that are more heterogeneous than modern popular focus on Pan Jinlian would suggest. Central among the many insights to be found is that despite gender performance in Chinese history being overwhelmingly determined by the needs of patriarchal authority, men and women in the late imperial period discovered diverse ways in which to reflect on how men constantly sought their own bearings in reference to women.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBrill-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWomen and Gender in China Studies ; v. 8-
dc.subjectLiterature and Cultural Studies-
dc.subjectAsian Studies-
dc.subjectGender Studies-
dc.subjectChinese History-
dc.titleWanton Women in Late-Imperial Chinese Literature: Models, Genres, Subversions and Traditions-
dc.typeBook-
dc.identifier.emailWu, C: wucuncun@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWu, C=rp01420-
dc.identifier.hkuros265769-
dc.publisher.placeLeiden-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats